Clinical Practice Patterns of Canadian Couple / Marital / Family Therapists

Clinical Practice Patterns of Canadian Couple / Marital / Family Therapists

Clinical Practice Patterns of Canadian Couple / Marital / Family Therapists

Clinical Practice Patterns of Canadian Couple / Marital / Family Therapistss

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Référence bibliographique [1564]

Beaton, John, Dienhart, Anna, Schmidt, Jonathan et Turner, Jean. 2009. «Clinical Practice Patterns of Canadian Couple / Marital / Family Therapists ». Journal of Marital & Family Therapy, vol. 35, no 2, p. 193-203.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The primary purpose of this study was to explore the clinical practice patterns of all Canadian couple / marital and family therapists (C / MFTs) who are members of AAMFT (including student, affiliate, associate, clinical, and supervisor). The secondary purpose of this study was to compare Canadian and U.S. clinical practice pattern data for clinical members of AAMFT. » (p. 193)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The final sample included 480 completed and returned surveys. [...] The survey was completed by different types of members: student (n = 50, 10.4%), affiliate (n = 23, 4.8%), associate (n = 59, 12%), clinical (n = 209, 43.5%), supervisor candidate (n = 19, 6.8%), supervisor (n = 111, 23.1%), and no response (n = 9, 1.8%). Members from all across Canada participated. » (p. 194)

Instruments:
Questionnaire envoyé par la poste

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This clinical practice pattern survey had two unique aspects. It was a national survey of American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) members in Canada that included all AAMFT membership categories, including student, affiliate, associate, clinical, and supervisor. It compared practice pattern data for clinical members from Canada and the United States. The results also showed that students, affiliates, and associates are very interested in identifying who they are as C⁄MFTs and that they are receiving various types of training. Clinical members in both Canada and the United States are fairly similar in terms of demographics and therapy practice, except when it comes to the models they identify as most influential. Future client satisfaction and outcome research is needed to determine how clients are specifically benefiting from therapy. » (p. 193)