Attachment, Perceived Conflict, and Couple Satisfaction: Test of a Mediational Dyadic Model

Attachment, Perceived Conflict, and Couple Satisfaction: Test of a Mediational Dyadic Model

Attachment, Perceived Conflict, and Couple Satisfaction: Test of a Mediational Dyadic Model

Attachment, Perceived Conflict, and Couple Satisfaction: Test of a Mediational Dyadic Models

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Référence bibliographique [1532]

Brassard, Audrey, Lussier, Yvan et Shaver, Phillip R. 2009. «Attachment, Perceived Conflict, and Couple Satisfaction: Test of a Mediational Dyadic Model ». Family Relations, vol. 58, no 5, p. 634-646.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objectives of the study were (a) to explicitly examine all the links between attachment, perception of conflict, and relationship satisfaction in a mediational model; (b) to explicitly examine dyadic effects—that is, how each partner’s attachment insecurities are related to his or her own and the partner’s outcomes; and (c) to examine these links in a fairly large sample of French-speaking Canadian couples.» (p. 637)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The participants were 299 heterosexual, Frenchspeaking Canadian couples. They were recruited by a survey firm, using random-digit dialing to locate people who were between 18 and 35 years of age and were either married or had been cohabiting for at least 6 months.» (p. 637)

Instruments :
- Experiences in Close Relationships (ECR) inventory (Brennan et al., 1998)
- «Inventory developed by Brassard and Lussier (2007) that summarized a list of 24 different sources of conflict […].» (p. 638)
- «Four-item version of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS; developed by Spanier, 1976; shortened and translated into French by Sabourin, Valois, & Lussier, 2005)» (p. 638)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Following the results, authors make few conclusions : «In line with Collins and Read’s (1990) findings, participants’ own attachment anxiety and avoidance predicted their own perceptions of conflict, suggesting that not only anxiety but also avoidance is associated with perceiving one’s relationship as conflictual. Moreover, women’s anxiety (but not avoidance) was associated with men’s perception of conflict, and men’s avoidance (but not anxiety) was associated with women’s perception of conflict. […] As predicted, each partner’s satisfaction was predicted by both own and partner’s perceptions of conflict. Because partners generally agreed about their level of conflict, these dyadic associations seem to represent aspects of each person’s perception of conflict that are not explained by the other person’s experience of the same conflicts. […] The link between participants’ own attachment anxiety and couple dissatisfaction was mediated in the multivariate model, for both men and women, by perception of conflict. […] For both men and women, the link between ones’ own avoidant attachment and one’s own relationship dissatisfaction was only partially mediated by conflict. In other words, being avoidant is linked with perceived conflict in committed relationships, perhaps by making conflict more unpleasant or difficult to resolve, but avoidance predicts couple dissatisfaction for other reasons as well.» (p. 641-642)