A Theory of the Viability of Incest: Djuna Barnes’s Ryder, The Antiphon and Nightwood

A Theory of the Viability of Incest: Djuna Barnes’s Ryder, The Antiphon and Nightwood

A Theory of the Viability of Incest: Djuna Barnes’s Ryder, The Antiphon and Nightwood

A Theory of the Viability of Incest: Djuna Barnes’s Ryder, The Antiphon and Nightwoods

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Référence bibliographique [1518]

Burgess, Jessica Marri. 2009. «A Theory of the Viability of Incest: Djuna Barnes’s Ryder, The Antiphon and Nightwood». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montreal, Université McGill, Département d’anglais.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« Through engagement with Barnes‘s work and her implicit theory of incest, this project seeks to investigate and challenge normative categories of viable relationships that currently do not (nor did they in Barnes‘s time) include incestuous relationships. » (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« In her three major works, Ryder (1928), The Antiphon (1958), and Nightwood (1936), Djuna Barnes explores incest as a mode of being and relating. She focuses on the relationships among the Ryders of Ryder, the Hobbses of The Antiphon, and between Nora Flood and Robin Vote of Nightwood as her three primary instantiations of the incestuous family apparatus. Taken together, Barnes’s works present a scale of viability for the incestuous relationship. [...] Barnes’s work suggests that it is the individual instantiations of the incestuous family apparatus that make incest a viable mode of being and relating, just as it is the individual instantiations of the non-incestuous family apparatus that allow the normative definition of the family to thrive. Barnes presents familial relationships as not taboo, and suggests that incest is not necessarily concomitant with trauma, fantasy, or abuse. Through analysis of Barnes’s work, this thesis sheds new light on a central dimension of Barnes’s work. In addition, through Barnes’s conceptions and presentations of incest, the project seeks to open up new understandings of incestuous relationships and their implications, as well as, more generally, consider ways to expand the range of ways-of-life – what I call livelihoods – accepted as valid and valuable (viable) by North American and European culture. » (p. 2)