Baby Boom Caregivers: Care in the Age of Individualization

Baby Boom Caregivers: Care in the Age of Individualization

Baby Boom Caregivers: Care in the Age of Individualization

Baby Boom Caregivers: Care in the Age of Individualizations

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Référence bibliographique [15]

Guberman, Nancy, Lavoie, Jean-Pierre, Blein, Laure et Olazabal, Ignace. 2012. «Baby Boom Caregivers: Care in the Age of Individualization ». The Gerontologist, vol. 52, no 2, p. 210-218.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[O]ur research objectives were (a) to better understand the diverse realities of Baby Boomer caregivers (their values concerning family solidarity, their various forms of organizing help, and the impacts on the different aspects of their lives) and (b) to identify their specific needs and expectations with regard to support and services.» (p. 212)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
39 caregivers born between 1945 and 1959 (31 women and 8 men).

Instruments :
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif
- Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Although all the caregivers interviewed do not self-identify as Baby Boomers, we can see that they all have been shaped by their common cohort history (Elder, 1975). This helps us to understand why they all claim they are experiencing care in a completely different way from their mothers and that they have a different perception of what caring for a relative means. They are increasingly reluctant to take on the daily, even hourly, demands of instrumental and personal care. The care they feel they can legitimately be asked to and that they are willing to provide is more related to “being there” for their relative and organizing and supervising the quality of care provided by others. This concept of care emerges in part as a strategy aimed at reconciling the different imperatives to which this generation of caregivers are subjected. Women, particularly, are now faced with somewhat conflicting expectations for social success and self-actualization, intermingled with certain lingering traditional expectations of women’s role in the family that have not altogether disappeared from society. It is all these demands that must now be balanced along with the demands of caregiving.» (p. 216)