Deporting Diaspora’s Future?: Forced Transnationalism and Generational Conflicts in the Haitian Community of Montreal

Deporting Diaspora’s Future?: Forced Transnationalism and Generational Conflicts in the Haitian Community of Montreal

Deporting Diaspora’s Future?: Forced Transnationalism and Generational Conflicts in the Haitian Community of Montreal

Deporting Diaspora’s Future?: Forced Transnationalism and Generational Conflicts in the Haitian Community of Montreals

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Référence bibliographique [1408]

Drotbohm, Heike. 2009. «Deporting Diaspora’s Future?: Forced Transnationalism and Generational Conflicts in the Haitian Community of Montreal ». Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self Knowledge, vol. 7, no 4, p. 69-84.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« In considering the inside perspective of the Haitian migrant community in the Canadian city of Montreal, where deportations of Haitian youth back to Haiti regularly causes much agitation, I will exemplify how the discussions interrelate with the selfperception of the migrant community. The different and apparently contradictory reactions that may be discerned among Haitian migrants will be analysed against the social and cultural context so as to elaborate on the different levels of meaning involved. With this examination of these ’deportation narratives’ I intend to illustrate mutual constructions of Otherness within this migrant group and how inner borders are constructed and maintained--borders that do not only divide social class, but the generations as well. » (p. 71)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’auteure a interviewé des adultes et des jeunes de la communauté haïtienne de Montréal [le nombre d’interviewés n’est pas donné].

Instruments:
Grille d’entretien semi directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« In recent years, and particularly since 9/11/2001, more and more delinquent Haitian youth have been deported from Canada back to Haiti. In this article the author analyzes the generation-specific reactions and statements within the migrant community. Elder migrants perceive of the deportation as a threat to their home country and as an assault upon their personal migration projects. For the younger generation, in contrast, the issue is rather one of negotiating one’s role within the migrant community and of coming to terms with their own life prospects in Canada. Both kinds of reactions become comprehensible if set in relation to one another. Furthermore, this article suggests examining present-day state regulative practices such as deportations not only in relation to the receiving states, but also in consideration of the consequences for the diaspora communities. » (p. 69)