Access to Post-Secondary Education in Canada Among the Children of Canadian Immigrants

Access to Post-Secondary Education in Canada Among the Children of Canadian Immigrants

Access to Post-Secondary Education in Canada Among the Children of Canadian Immigrants

Access to Post-Secondary Education in Canada Among the Children of Canadian Immigrantss

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Référence bibliographique [1381]

Finnie, Ross et Mueller, Richard E. 2009. Access to Post-Secondary Education in Canada Among the Children of Canadian Immigrants. Toronto: Educational Policy Institute.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The contribution of this paper is to present new empirical evidence on one particular aspect of this set of issues: access to post-secondary education (PSE) on the part of ‘first generation’ and ‘second generation’ immigrants » (p. 2)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« The paper addresses the following questions: Does access to PSE [post-secondary education] differ, overall, for first and second generation immigrants (i.e., the children of immigrants) as compared with ‘non-immigrant’ Canadians (or third or higher generation immigrants)? How do these differences vary by country of origin or by different combinations of the mother’s and the father’s immigration status, including cases where one parent is an immigrant and the other is not? What are the underlying factors that appear to be driving these patterns? » (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The data used in the analysis were taken from the Youth in Transition Survey – Reading or A Cohort (generally known as YITS-A). » (p. 5) « The YITS respondents considered to be the children of immigrants in this paper include: i) those who came to this country as immigrants themselves but arrived early enough to complete their primary schooling and take advantage of PSE opportunities in Canada and ii) those who were born in Canada to parents who were immigrants. » (p.iii)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This paper exploits the extremely rich Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) data to investigate access to post-secondary education (PSE) among the children of immigrants in Canada [...]. The results show that these first and second generation immigrants are, overall, considerably more likely to attend PSE than non-immigrant youth, that these differences are driven principally by higher university participation rates rather than by college attendance, and that the patterns vary a great deal by source country. The immigrant differences are partly explained by certain demographic characteristics (e.g., province of residence and living in a city), by immigrants’ parents’ relatively high education levels, and by other observable factors such as parental aspirations regarding their children’s education. However, substantial differences remain even after controlling for these and other factors. » (p. iii) Ce document peut intéresser les chercheurs qui travaillent sur la famille au Québec puisque des données statistiques pour la province du Québec sont analysées.