The Influence of Dyadic Coping on Inflammation in the Context of Chronic Parenting Stress

The Influence of Dyadic Coping on Inflammation in the Context of Chronic Parenting Stress

The Influence of Dyadic Coping on Inflammation in the Context of Chronic Parenting Stress

The Influence of Dyadic Coping on Inflammation in the Context of Chronic Parenting Stresss

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Référence bibliographique [13166]

Scarcello, Sabrina. 2014. «The Influence of Dyadic Coping on Inflammation in the Context of Chronic Parenting Stress». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département de psychologie.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of the present study was to evaluate the association between dyadic coping and inflammation, which is elevated under chronic stress and increases risk for health threats.» (p. iii)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«It was hypothesized that positive dyadic coping would buffer the impact of chronic stress on perceived stress, and in turn reduce inflammation.» (p. iii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Forty-four parents of children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder [participated to the study].» (p. iii)

Instruments :
- Dyadic Coping Inventory (DCI)
- Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS)
- Couple Satisfaction Index (CSI)
- Problem Behaviour Scale
- Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Positive dyadic coping, but not negative dyadic coping, was uniquely associated with circulating CRP [C-reactive protein]. The results corroborate the pivotal role of dyadic coping as a predictor of inflammation. Finally, positive dyadic coping, but not negative dyadic coping buffered the impact of chronic stress on perceived caregiving burden. Results indicate, however, that perceived stress did not explain the association between positive dyadic coping and inflammation. […] Furthermore, dyadic coping, but not social support, was uniquely associated with inflammation. After adjusting for differences in marital relationship satisfaction and perceived social support, positive dyadic coping became marginally associated with circulating CRP, but the change in effect size was trivial, therefore, this change in statistical significance is attributable to the small sample size.» (p. 33)