Who Benefits from Paid Family Leave? Impact of Expansions in Canadian Paid Family Leave on Maternal Employment and Transfer Income

Who Benefits from Paid Family Leave? Impact of Expansions in Canadian Paid Family Leave on Maternal Employment and Transfer Income

Who Benefits from Paid Family Leave? Impact of Expansions in Canadian Paid Family Leave on Maternal Employment and Transfer Income

Who Benefits from Paid Family Leave? Impact of Expansions in Canadian Paid Family Leave on Maternal Employment and Transfer Incomes

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [1313]

Hanratty, Maria et Trzcinski, Eileen. 2009. «Who Benefits from Paid Family Leave? Impact of Expansions in Canadian Paid Family Leave on Maternal Employment and Transfer Income ». Journal of Population Economics, vol. 22, no 3, p. 693-711.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This paper examines the impact of the expansion of Canadian paid family leave from 25 to 50 weeks on December 31, 2000 on women’s post-birth employment dynamics and transfer receipt. » (p. 694)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Les données sont issues du National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth de 1998-1999, 2000-2001 et 2002-2003.

Instruments:
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This analysis finds that the expansion was associated with a substantial increase in family leave and social assistance payments to women with children age zero to one relative to women with children age three to four. It was also associated with a decrease of 20 percentage points (40%) in the share of mothers returning to work within 1 year after birth. Despite this increase in leave time, returns to work converged to earlier levels once paid leave eligibility expired. In addition, there was no evidence that women with children age one suffered a decrease in relative employment rates compared to those with children age three to four. While the paid leave expansions increased resources to women with children, the gains were not distributed equally. Whether measured in terms of maternal time at home or transfer payments, the increase was larger for women from more advantaged socioeconomic groups, as defined by education, non-wage income, and marital status. » (p. 694)