Siblings’ Interpretations of Conflict: The Link Between Relationship Quality and Conflict Strategies?

Siblings’ Interpretations of Conflict: The Link Between Relationship Quality and Conflict Strategies?

Siblings’ Interpretations of Conflict: The Link Between Relationship Quality and Conflict Strategies?

Siblings’ Interpretations of Conflict: The Link Between Relationship Quality and Conflict Strategies?s

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Référence bibliographique [13123]

Rajput, Amandeep. 2014. «Siblings’ Interpretations of Conflict: The Link Between Relationship Quality and Conflict Strategies?». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département des sciences de l’éducation.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«More specifically, the purpose of this study was to examine whether children’s interpretations of ambiguous conflict scenarios mediate the link between siblings’ relationship quality and the conflict strategies that they use during disputes.» (p. 1)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«We expected that children’s attribution of intent would explain the link between sibling relationship quality and conflict strategies employed during sibling disputes.» (p. iii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«A total of 122 six-to eight-year-old children (62 younger and 60 older siblings; 49 girls) were presented with ambiguous provocation scenarios and asked to attribute their siblings’ intent.» (p. iii)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Results revealed that children attributed more hostile intent to older siblings and instrumental intent to younger siblings. Moreover, when children had a more negative relationship quality with their siblings they also reported using fewer constructive strategies and engaged in more aggressive behaviors. In addition, sibling relationship quality was negatively associated with hostile intent and positively linked to instrumental intent. Furthermore, children who attributed more instrumental intent also used more constructive conflict strategies. Finally, attributions of intent did not explain the link between relationship quality and conflict strategies employed. This study suggests that methodologies commonly used with peers can be adapted to further our understanding of conflict processes among siblings.» (p. iii)