Development of Personal Identity Among Refugee Adolescents: Facilitating Elements and Obstacles

Development of Personal Identity Among Refugee Adolescents: Facilitating Elements and Obstacles

Development of Personal Identity Among Refugee Adolescents: Facilitating Elements and Obstacles

Development of Personal Identity Among Refugee Adolescents: Facilitating Elements and Obstacless

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [13041]

Ndengeyingoma, Assumpta, de Montigny, Francine et Miron, Jean-Marie. 2014. «Development of Personal Identity Among Refugee Adolescents: Facilitating Elements and Obstacles ». Journal of Child Health Care, vol. 18, no 4, p. 369-377.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This qualitative study examines what contributes to the development of personal identity among refugee adolescents of African origin who have immigrated to Quebec.» (p. 369)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«In the case of adolescents from sub-Saharan Africa who are refugees in Quebec, environmental characteristics, both family and social, as well as personal elements contributing to the development of personal identity remain less well known. The question that arises is the following: what are these characteristics and elements?» (p. 370)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur des entretiens individuels avec douze jeunes adolescents (6 garçons et 6 filles) qui sont arrivés au Québec avant d’avoir quatre ans.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


Lorsqu’il s’agit de mesurer l’impact des éléments familiaux dans le développement de l’identité des adolescents, les auteurs constatent que :«[f]amily dynamics include elements that facilitate the development of personal identity: family values, distribution of roles, and relationships among siblings. A constraining component, such as parental control, completes this subcategory. According to the adolescents interviewed, family values are elements that facilitate the development of their identity. […] In this study, three quarters of the adolescents found that the word ‘change’ was not appropriate for describing the distribution of roles; they preferred to use ‘adjustment’. They explained this terminological choice by the fact that some roles were temporary. For example, taking care of brothers and sisters is not a permanent role: it lasts only as long as necessary while the parents get organized. In order to describe themselves in relationship to their families, one of the things on which they based their comments was their capacity to assume responsibilities. […] Being a model for their siblings was also important. Close ties between brothers and sisters and respect for the sibling hierarchy led to older siblings becoming examples and advisers for younger ones. According to the participants, parental control influenced their choice of close friends and imposed strict discipline, with no possibility of discussion.» (p. 373-374)