Clinical and Social Factors Associated with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medication Use: Population-Based Longitudinal Study

Clinical and Social Factors Associated with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medication Use: Population-Based Longitudinal Study

Clinical and Social Factors Associated with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medication Use: Population-Based Longitudinal Study

Clinical and Social Factors Associated with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medication Use: Population-Based Longitudinal Studys

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Référence bibliographique [12789]

Galéra, Cédric, Pingault, Jean-Baptiste, Michel, Grégory, Bouvard, Manuel-Pierre, Melchior, Maria, Falissard, Bruno, Boivin, Michel, Tremblay, Richard E. et Côté, Sylvana M. 2014. «Clinical and Social Factors Associated with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medication Use: Population-Based Longitudinal Study ». British Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 205, no 4, p. 291-297.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The aim of the present study was to go beyond these limits by using a population-based birth cohort to assess the baseline and longitudinal influences of environmental and behavioural predictors on ADHD[Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder] medication between the ages of 3.5 and 10 years.» (p. 292)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«We tested the hypotheses that: (a) hyperactivity–impulsivity symptoms and inattention symptoms would predict medication use in this population-based sample; (b) other risk factors could heighten/lessen the likelihood of receiving ADHD medication.» (p. 292)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Data were drawn from the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD). […] The sample with complete data at the first assessment comprised 1920 children.» (p. 292)

Instruments :
Interviewer Computerized Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«As expected, the strongest clinical predictors of ADHD medication use were symptoms of hyperactivity–inattention. This finding is reassuring since hyperactivity–inattention symptoms are the core behavioural symptoms of ADHD explicitly targeted by this medication. […] Boys were more likely than girls to receive medication, even when controlling for the frequency of hyperactivity–inattention symptoms. […] Most importantly and consistent with prior research, low maternal education was associated with ADHD prescription. […] It is useful to note that other social variables were related to ADHD medication in univariate analyses (coercive parenting, non-intact family, insufficient family income) but were not associated with the study outcome in multivariate analyses, suggesting more distal influences or a less important role in medication use. Parental immigrant status (which was strongly associated with racial/ethnic minorities) was related to lower ADHD medication use.» (p. 293-295)