Resilience in International Migrant Women Following Violence Associated with Pregnancy

Resilience in International Migrant Women Following Violence Associated with Pregnancy

Resilience in International Migrant Women Following Violence Associated with Pregnancy

Resilience in International Migrant Women Following Violence Associated with Pregnancys

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Référence bibliographique [12785]

Gagnon, Anita J. et Stewart, Donna E. 2014. «Resilience in International Migrant Women Following Violence Associated with Pregnancy ». Archives of Women’s Mental Health, vol. 17, no 4, p. 303-310.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In our project, we sought to elicit the perspectives of migrant women about the strategies and resources that helped them to move beyond the experiences of violence they reported. Understanding factors that contribute to resilience in the opinion of migrant new mothers who have experienced VAP [violence associated with pregnancy] may assist in developing interventions to assist less resilient women to prevent adverse mental health outcomes such as postpartum depression.» (p. 304)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Our research question was: What factors maintain or enhance resilience in international migrant women who have recently given birth following exposure to VAP?» (p. 304)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The ten participants were born in one of several countries: Bangladesh, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, or St. Vincent. They ranged in age from 27 to 48 years and had between one and six children. They had been in Canada from 2 to 8 years at the time of the interviews.» (p. 306)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Our participants identified a range of internal, external, and systemic factors that promoted their resilience. Internal factors fell into two groups—psychological and coping techniques. It may be helpful for less resilient migrant women who are at risk for PPD [postpartum depression] to optimize psychological factors such as self-esteem and optimism through individual or group discussion, counseling, or brief cognitive behavioural therapy. Coping techniques such as self-calming, keeping active, drawing on past experiences, and letting go may also be enhanced through group discussion, counselling or cognitive behavioural therapy. As many women identified external factors such as social support and attendance at school, work, or church, it may be helpful to encourage social networks and new mothers’ groups to enhance resilience in vulnerable migrant mothers. Systemic factors such as health, legal, and social services are also vitally important and need to be easily accessible to vulnerable women. In addition, supportive government policies provide an essential safety net for migrant mothers who have experienced VAP as illustrated by some of our participants’ comments.» (p. 308)