Police Charging Practices for Incidents of Intimate Partner Violence in Canada

Police Charging Practices for Incidents of Intimate Partner Violence in Canada

Police Charging Practices for Incidents of Intimate Partner Violence in Canada

Police Charging Practices for Incidents of Intimate Partner Violence in Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [12709]

Dawson, Myrna et Hotton, Tina. 2014. «Police Charging Practices for Incidents of Intimate Partner Violence in Canada ». Journal of Research in Crime & Delinquency, vol. 51, no 5, p. 1-29.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
Le but de l’article est d’étudier et de comparer les pratiques judiciaires policières face aux cas de violence conjugale dans les différentes provinces canadiennes.

Questions/Hypothèses :
«[W]e examine the following research questions: (1) what legal or extralegal factors increase or decrease the likelihood of police charging in cases of IPV (intimate partner violence) in Canada? (2) Do these factors vary across the provinces?» (p. 3)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This analysis uses data from the 2008 Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR2) Survey. The UCR2 survey is a census of individual criminal incidents reported to police in Canada and includes characteristics of victims, accused persons, and incidents.» (p. 12)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«There is no official national charging policy on IPV in Canada; however, all jurisdictions have officially supported a pro-charging policy since the mid-1980s (Johnson and Dawson 2011).» (p. 2) «In Canada, IPV which encompasses both spousal and dating violence represents one out of every four police-reported violent crimes and the vast majority of these victims (80 percent) are women» (p. 3) Based on this research, the comparison between Quebec and the other provinces shows that «[t]here were only a few differences observed across the provinces in terms of the legal and extralegal factors found to be associated with the police decision to proceed with charges. First, criminal harassment and related offences had significantly lower odds of charges being recommended in some, but not all provinces. Quebec was distinct from other jurisdictions in that it was the only province to have significantly higher odds of charges being recommended for these offenses.» (p. 20)