My Mother Is Sensitive, but I Am Too Tired to Know: Infant Sleep as a Moderator of Prospective Relations between Maternal Sensitivity and Infant Outcomes

My Mother Is Sensitive, but I Am Too Tired to Know: Infant Sleep as a Moderator of Prospective Relations between Maternal Sensitivity and Infant Outcomes

My Mother Is Sensitive, but I Am Too Tired to Know: Infant Sleep as a Moderator of Prospective Relations between Maternal Sensitivity and Infant Outcomes

My Mother Is Sensitive, but I Am Too Tired to Know: Infant Sleep as a Moderator of Prospective Relations between Maternal Sensitivity and Infant Outcomess

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Référence bibliographique [12578]

Bernier, Annie, Bélanger, Marie-Ève, Tarabulsy, George M., Simard, Valérie et Carrier, Julie. 2014. «My Mother Is Sensitive, but I Am Too Tired to Know: Infant Sleep as a Moderator of Prospective Relations between Maternal Sensitivity and Infant Outcomes ». Infant Behavior & Development, vol. 37, p. 682-694.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he current report investigates the moderating role of infant sleep in the associations between the quality of mother-infant interactions and three important indicators of child functioning: attachment security, theory of mind, and executive functioning.» (p. 683)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«It was expected that current sleep indices would interact with earlier maternal sensitivity in the prediction of infant attachment security, perspective-taking abilities, and executive functioning, such that the expected links between sensitivity and outcomes would be greater among infants getting relatively more sleep at night and greater proportions of their total sleep during the night.» (p. 685)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Families were recruited from random birth lists of a large Canadian metropolitan area provided by the Ministry of Health and Social Services. Inclusion criteria were full-term pregnancy and the absence of any known disability or delay in the infant. The sample consisted of 63 infant-mother dyads, 27 girls and 36 boys.» (p. 685)

Instruments :
- Maternal Behavior Q-Sort
- Attachment Behavior Q-Sort

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results showed that maternal sensitivity was related in expected ways to attachment security only among infants who got more sleep at night, and to conflict-EF [executive functioning] and perspective-taking abilities for those who got greater proportions of their sleep at night. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that certain aspects of concurrent sleep may foster the expression of the levels of socio-emotional and cognitive functioning that are made possible by infants’ earlier exposure to maternal sensitivity. In contrast, the non-significant links between maternal sensitivity and outcomes among infants showing shorter night sleep duration or lower night sleep proportion suggest that poor sleep might interfere with the developmental processes linking caregiving to child adaptation. Thus, although the current design precludes causal inference, the results are consistent with the notion that only infants for whom nocturnal sleep was longer or more prominent reaped the usual benefits of maternal sensitivity. That this pattern of results was observed in three important spheres of functioning (attachment, theory of mind, executive functioning) suggests that it might be a broad phenomenon with implications for other domains of development.» (p. 689)