I Love You, Brad, but You Reduce my Student Loan Eligibility: The Perils of Marriage in Canadian Student Assistance Programs

I Love You, Brad, but You Reduce my Student Loan Eligibility: The Perils of Marriage in Canadian Student Assistance Programs

I Love You, Brad, but You Reduce my Student Loan Eligibility: The Perils of Marriage in Canadian Student Assistance Programs

I Love You, Brad, but You Reduce my Student Loan Eligibility: The Perils of Marriage in Canadian Student Assistance Programss

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Référence bibliographique [12516]

Usher, Alexander. 2004. I Love You, Brad, but You Reduce my Student Loan Eligibility: The Perils of Marriage in Canadian Student Assistance Programs. Coll. «Canadian Higher Education Report Series». Toronto: Educational Policy Institute, Inc.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This short paper examine[s] the effects of marriage on eligibility for student assistance programs.» (p. iii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Being married as a student has a number of possible effects on eligibility for student assistance depending on one’s age and the employment status of one’s partner. A few are positive; they result in greater eligibility for assistance. Some are neutral; they result in no change in student assistance eligibility. Among the most common results, however, is vastly decreased eligibility for student assistance. In some cases, the marriage penalty is so extreme that in can legitimately be called a disincentive to marriage. Outside Quebec, outdated student assistance regulations effectively assume that all married students are married to other students. […] Now that the 2004 federal budget has required a revision of contribution requirements to the Canada Student Loans Program, the Government of Canada has an opportunity to improve loan eligibility for married students by copying the Government of Quebec and putting spouses and parents on an equal footing.» (p. iii)