The Emergence of Personalist Feminism: Catholicism and the Marriage-Preparation Movement in Quebec 1940-1966

The Emergence of Personalist Feminism: Catholicism and the Marriage-Preparation Movement in Quebec 1940-1966

The Emergence of Personalist Feminism: Catholicism and the Marriage-Preparation Movement in Quebec 1940-1966

The Emergence of Personalist Feminism: Catholicism and the Marriage-Preparation Movement in Quebec 1940-1966s

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Référence bibliographique [12412]

Gauvreau, Michael. 2002. «The Emergence of Personalist Feminism: Catholicism and the Marriage-Preparation Movement in Quebec 1940-1966». Dans Households of Faith: Family, Gender and Community in Canada, 1760-1969 , sous la dir. de Nancy Christie, p. 319-347. Montréal; Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This essay argues that the impetus, definition, and institutional promotion of these ‘modern’ attitudes came from within Catholicism itself, but not from the institutional hierarchy, whose outlook on most social remained exceedingly conservative. A new progressive Catholic attitude to questions of family and sexuality was articulated by women, who dominated the carious Catholic Action movements which flourished during this period as expressions of lay initiative.» (p. 321)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’auteur utilise des sources premières comme des journaux de l’époque et d’autres écrits de la période portant sur les questions familiales et de sexualité.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«By the late 1960s the creative synthesis between Roman Catholicism and the initiative and aspirations of laywomen that had launched the marriage-preparation movement in Quebec had broken down in the wake of the papal encyclical Humanae vitae, which categorically condemned all forms of ‘artificial’ birth control. As the lay directorate of the SPM [Service de Préparation au Mariage] sought to jettison official affiliation with the church in response to what it believed was the more ‘pluralist’ nature of Quebec society in the wake of de-confessionalization, the clergy themselves attempted to reassert tighter control over definitions of marriage and sexuality by launching their own courses in premarital counselling. What this attempt to reimpose clerical authority indicated was that by the late 1960s Catholicism, particularly in the area of marriage and sexuality, no longer mediated between tradition and modernity. […] The SPM’s program, which stressed sexual education, family planning, anatomy, and sexual role-playing, was dismissed as a humanistic gospel of liberation at odds with the traditional teachings of the church.» (p. 338)