Mapping the Margins: The Family and Social discipline in Canada, 1700-1975

Mapping the Margins: The Family and Social discipline in Canada, 1700-1975

Mapping the Margins: The Family and Social discipline in Canada, 1700-1975

Mapping the Margins: The Family and Social discipline in Canada, 1700-1975s

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [12411]

Christie, Nancy et Gauvreau, Michael. 2004. Mapping the Margins: The Family and Social discipline in Canada, 1700-1975. Montréal; Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press; Ithaca.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The purpose of this volume is twofold. First, it seeks to examine the ways in which the family defined membership, dependency, and exclusion and, in turn, how it was the agent in articulating institutional and state constructions of marginality; and second, it explicitly sets out, through an examination of those who fell outside de demographic measure of the conjugal household, to test the prevailing historiographic assumption that the nuclear family was irrevocably normative in Western society.» (p. 4)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«This volume explores […] the historical experience of widows, spinsters, reconstituted families, bachelors, orphans, the insane, the elderly, and unmarried mothers in order to determine which conjunction of variables – gender, class, or socio-economic and marital status – combined to marginalize and stigmatize specific family members. And by so doing, the book advances the central theoretical proposition that the family must be conceived like any other set of social relationships, as a regulatory institution resting upon a system of unequal hierarchies of age, gender, and social status.» (p. 4) «The essays in this volume seek to provoke new interpretations that place the culture of the family at the centre of narratives of social history, as integral to the articulation of social identities and to the process of state formation. Indeed, any historical elucidation of the transition towards modern social practices must begin with the study of the form and function of the family, for as these essays show, far from being divorced from the ebb and flow of history, it was a fundamental determinant of the pace of social change.» (p. 15-16)

Les texte suivants font l’objet d’une fiche dans Famili@:
- Brun, Josette, «Gender, Family, and Mutual Assistance in New France: Widows, Widowers, and Orphans in Eighteenth-Century Quebec»
- Bradbury, Bettina, «Itineraries of Marriage and Widowhood in Nineteenth-Century Montreal»
- Gossage, Peter, «Marginal by Definition? Stepchildren in Quebec, 1866-1920»
- Hubert, Olliver, «The Invention of the Margin as an Invention of the Family: The Case of Rural Quebec in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries»
- Baillargeon, Denyse, «Orphans in Quebec: On the Margins of Which Family?»