Anxiety and Amnesia: Muslim Women’s Equality in Postcolonial India

Anxiety and Amnesia: Muslim Women’s Equality in Postcolonial India

Anxiety and Amnesia: Muslim Women’s Equality in Postcolonial India

Anxiety and Amnesia: Muslim Women’s Equality in Postcolonial Indias

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Référence bibliographique [12385]

Narain, Vrinda. 2005. «Anxiety and Amnesia: Muslim Women’s Equality in Postcolonial India». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université McGill, Département de droit.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Dans cette thèse, j’étudie, à travers les yeux des femmes musulmanes de l’Inde postcoloniale, ces femmes situées à la marge tant des communautés religieuses que de la nation, la relation entre identité sexuelle et nation.» (p. 4)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«In their construction as citizens of independent India, women have been treated as less than equal in the domain of family and community. The postcolonial state has constructed women not as equal citizens, but rather, simultaneously as gendered citizens, and as citizens with a prior religious/cultural identity. The notion of women’s citizenship rights has been filtered through the lenses of gender and cultural essentialism, negating constitutional guarantees of equality for women. Such a construction of citizenship underscores the conduct of the state in reinforcing women’s political and social persona as being primarily gendered and differentiated according to religious identity, focusing invariably on women’s difference with men. […] In contrast to the constitutional guarantee of equality, state-sanctioned inequality within the family persists. Although the nationalist movement was strongly supported by women leaders during the struggle for Independence, the political promise of that cooperation did not result in an aggressive program of social reform to enforce constitutional guarantees of gender equality in family law. Indian women are disadvantaged by the state, which owes duties and responsibilities differently, not just to men and women, but also differently to women based upon religious identity.» (p. 186-187)