Models of Earning and Caring: Determinants of the Division of Work

Models of Earning and Caring: Determinants of the Division of Work

Models of Earning and Caring: Determinants of the Division of Work

Models of Earning and Caring: Determinants of the Division of Works

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Référence bibliographique [12252]

Ravanera, Zenaida, Beaujot, Roderic et Liu, Jianye. 2009. «Models of Earning and Caring: Determinants of the Division of Work ». Revue canadienne de sociologie / Canadian Review of Sociology, vol. 46, no 4, p. 319-337.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The main objective of the paper is to study the determinants of the division of tasks between spouses […]. We aim at finding factors that are relevant in predicting whether a given couple might be classified as traditional or more egalitarian in its division of paid and unpaid work, and examine how the division of work might be affected by life course considerations as well as the socioeconomic situation of individuals and couples. We also look at differences across regions of Canada, given the stronger policy support for families in Quebec.» (p. 320)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The data used here are from the Canadian General Social Survey on Time Use conducted by Statistics Canada in 2005.» (p. 325)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Our analysis shows that the partner with relatively smaller resources […] is more likely to do more of the unpaid work, who in majority of cases is still the wife or female partner. […] Young and cohabiting women often prefer to be in Shared model […] but having children results in women doing more unpaid work (particularly when the children are aged 0 to 5). Consequently, it is no surprise that many of these women choose to remain childless or postpone having children to later in life. The imbalance in sharing of unpaid work is probably one of the factors that contribute to the persistent below replacement fertility in Canada. Finally, there is evidence here that the institutional and policy context is relevant. That is, the availability of child care would ease the burden of women having to do more unpaid work when young children are present. As shown by the results of our analysis, the proportion of Augmented Shared model particularly for women with children aged 0 to 5 is lowest in Quebec where there are more child care facilities than in other provinces, suggesting that this availability promotes alternate arrangement of more egalitarian sharing of unpaid work in couples, and possibly encourages more couples to have children. The greater support for parental leave in Quebec, including dedicated leave for fathers and a greater uptake by fathers, may further promote the Shared model.» (p. 335)