The Desire for Multiple Pregnancy in Male and Female Infertility Patients

The Desire for Multiple Pregnancy in Male and Female Infertility Patients

The Desire for Multiple Pregnancy in Male and Female Infertility Patients

The Desire for Multiple Pregnancy in Male and Female Infertility Patientss

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Référence bibliographique [12191]

Child, Tim J., Henderson, Anna Maria et Lin Tan, Seang. 2004. «The Desire for Multiple Pregnancy in Male and Female Infertility Patients ». Human Reproduction, vol. 19, no 3, p. 558-561.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«We performed a prospective study to quantify fertility patients’ desire for multiple birth and the extent to which demographic variables such as sex, age, duration of infertility, previous children, history of assisted reproductive treatment, and recognition of the increased risks of multiple pregnancy affect this desire.» (p. 558)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Male and female patients attending the McGill Reproductive Center, a university hospital tertiary level fertility clinic, during the year 2000 were asked to participate in the study. Patients were at all stages of treatment; some were primary consultations for infertility, while others were returning for review after one or multiple treatments.» (p. 558) «A total of 801 patients completed the questionnaire (460 women, 341 men; response rate 55 and 46% respectively).» (p. 559)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«We found that a significant proportion of male and female infertility patients prefer multiple pregnancy to singleton birth. We subsequently identified, with multiple logistic regression analysis, independent variables associated with a desire for multiple gestation. Increasing desire for multiple birth with increasing length of infertility or previous cycles of assisted reproductive treatment may represent desperation for an ’instant family’. Interestingly, patient age did not affect outcome. Patients with children were less likely to want a multiple birth. […] Patients recognizing the increased fetal risks of multiple pregnancy were significantly less likely to want this outcome […] Patients in our centre are informed of the increased risks of multiple pregnancy during clinic appointments and counselling sessions at each stage of treatment. These findings suggest that patient education may play an important role in reducing desire for multiple birth.» (p. 559-560)