Adapted Couple Therapy (ACT) for pathological gamblers: A promising avenue

Adapted Couple Therapy (ACT) for pathological gamblers: A promising avenue

Adapted Couple Therapy (ACT) for pathological gamblers: A promising avenue

Adapted Couple Therapy (ACT) for pathological gamblers: A promising avenues

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Référence bibliographique [12168]

Bertrand, Karine, Dufour, Magali, Wright, John et Lasnier, Benoît. 2008. «Adapted Couple Therapy (ACT) for pathological gamblers: A promising avenue ». Journal of Gambling Studies, vol. 24, no 3, p. 393-409.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This article therefore proposes to present a critical review of (1) literature offering a better understanding of the complex interactions that may exist between the couple relationship and pathological gambling, and (2) studies on the effects of couple therapy on pathological gamblers and their partners. We will end by presenting Adapted Couple Therapy (ACT) for pathological gamblers, a promising therapeutic model we have developed not only on the basis of the scientific literature, but in collaboration with actors in Québec’s clinical settings.» (p. 394)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«We believe that the addition of ACT to individual cognitive-behavioral therapy for pathological gamblers is likely to result in numerous positive consequences: (1) improvement effectiveness of individual treatment with regards to pathological gamblers’ gambling habits, (2) relief of personal distress resulting from the consequences of pathological gambling and couple conflicts, as much in pathological gamblers as in their spouses, and (3) improved couple happiness for both partners. We can equally formulate the hypothesis that taking the partner’s personal and couple distress into account in the treatment of pathological gambling is likely to provide increased protection of children in certain situations, as the latter suffer not only from parents’ gambling problems, but also from couple conflicts that erupt in the household. Furthermore, the addition of a couple component to the treatment of pathological gambling also facilitates access to the gambler’s family system. Issues of substance abuse, violence and mental health may thus be better identified and suitable services may be provided to gamblers, their partners or children, if need be.» (p. 404)