Discourses of Stress, Social Inequities, and the Everyday Worlds of First Nations Women in a Remote Northern Canadian Community

Discourses of Stress, Social Inequities, and the Everyday Worlds of First Nations Women in a Remote Northern Canadian Community

Discourses of Stress, Social Inequities, and the Everyday Worlds of First Nations Women in a Remote Northern Canadian Community

Discourses of Stress, Social Inequities, and the Everyday Worlds of First Nations Women in a Remote Northern Canadian Communitys

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [12156]

Adelson, Naomi. 2008. «Discourses of Stress, Social Inequities, and the Everyday Worlds of First Nations Women in a Remote Northern Canadian Community ». Ethos, vol. 36, no 3, p. 316-333.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Allan Young’s classic thesis on stress discourse underscores the way in which the biomedical discourse of ‘stress’ reflects and legitimizes existing social inequities even as it removes the language of stress to the decontextualized domain of the clinic. In this article, I address the way in which the ‘stress discourse’ of a group of young adult Cree women who live in a remote northern Canadian village reflects and reinscribes the social, cultural, and historical conditions of inequity as part and parcel of community life.» (p. 316)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Knowing, too, that the language of ‘stress’ was already common in the community (personal communication, George Masty, July 1999), I wanted to ask the questions raised by the Kirmayer et al. study and explore more fully what women of this community meant when they used that term. How, in other words, was ‘stress’ locally interpreted, enacted, and given meaning?» (p. 319)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Twenty percent (N = 14) of the young adult women between the ages of 25–40 [living in the Whapmagoostui community] agreed to an interview or group discussion on this subject. The women who participated in the study are a fair representation of the young adult women of this community.» (p. 322)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The women spoke of the business of their everyday lives: of their days at work, at evening school, raising a family, contributing to community initiatives, or tending to elders; and of tensions within the household because of marital, multigenerational, or other interpersonal problems. The women work primarily in the local government office, at the school, or in the newly created day care facility. Some may spend a portion of their day with parents or elderly grandparents, assisting them in their homes or with meals. […] The women spoke hesitantly, but emphatically, of the burdens placed on them by men who will not take on a fair share of the household duties, regardless of either their or their wives’ workloads. None of the women offered a rationale as to why it is that women are primarily responsible for so much of the daily family and community workload, except that they did not question this as their proper role. They said that the routines and work of their daily lives, although expected, left them at times exhausted, sad, unable to complete things, worried, or emotional, and that they never have time left for themselves.» (p. 322-323)