Law, Grace and Same-Sex Marriage: Canadian Lutheran Perspectives

Law, Grace and Same-Sex Marriage: Canadian Lutheran Perspectives

Law, Grace and Same-Sex Marriage: Canadian Lutheran Perspectives

Law, Grace and Same-Sex Marriage: Canadian Lutheran Perspectivess

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Référence bibliographique [12103]

Priebe, Sarah. 2011. «Law, Grace and Same-Sex Marriage: Canadian Lutheran Perspectives». Mémoire de maîtrise, Québec, Université Laval, Faculté de théologie et de sciences religieuses.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of this thesis is threefold; to examine what these differences are, to determine where and how they have emerged (or evolved) from historic Lutheran tradition, and to analyse their possible repercussions on the issue of same-sex marriage.» (p. 3)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The hypothesis put forward in this body of work is that contemporary ELCIC [(Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada)] Lutherans who would like to see the church bless same-sex unions hold a different perspective on the relationship between law and grace than do their opponents.» (p. 3)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«Contemporary ELCIC Lutherans may not use words like ‘verbal inspiration’ or ‘inerrancy’ when referring to Scripture’s origins and nature, but many do oppose same-sex marriage on the grounds that homosexuality is explicitly condemned by Scripture […]. Supporters of same-sex marriage do not believe that certain actions are intrinsically sinful, even if they are condemned by Scripture. Such a view negates verbal inspiration and inerrancy.» (p. 114) L’auteure conclut que «supporters of same-sex marriage are inheritors of the social gospel movement of the twentieth century. They speak in the language of social justice and do not hesitate to refer to findings in fields such as biology, psychology and sociology to support their cause. Perhaps most important is the shift from concern for the next life to concern for better living conditions for all in this life. Traditionalists show great amounts of concern for personal spiritual development (characterized, in this case, by the process of sanctification); liberals see personal spiritual development as something that happens through the process of acting out of love for one’s neighbour.» (p. 115)