Frequently Asked Questions about Kiskisik Awasisak: Remember the Children. Understanding the Overrepresentation of First Nations Children in the Child Welfare System

Frequently Asked Questions about Kiskisik Awasisak: Remember the Children. Understanding the Overrepresentation of First Nations Children in the Child Welfare System

Frequently Asked Questions about Kiskisik Awasisak: Remember the Children. Understanding the Overrepresentation of First Nations Children in the Child Welfare System

Frequently Asked Questions about Kiskisik Awasisak: Remember the Children. Understanding the Overrepresentation of First Nations Children in the Child Welfare Systems

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Référence bibliographique [12036]

Sinha, Vandna, Trocme, Nico, Fallon, Barbara, MacLaurin, Bruce, Fast, Elizabeth, Prokop, Shelley Thomas, Petti, Tara, Kozlowski, Anna, Black, Tara, Weightman, Pamela, Bennett, Marlyn, Formsma, Jocelyn, Brascoupe, Pierre, O’Brien, Stephanie, Flette, Elsie, Gray, Richard, Lucas, Linda, Hoey, Shawn, Levi, Judy, Montgomery, Monty et Richard, Kenn. 2011. Frequently Asked Questions about Kiskisik Awasisak: Remember the Children. Understanding the Overrepresentation of First Nations Children in the Child Welfare System. Ontario: Assemblée des Premières Nations.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This report presents a profile of the child maltreatment-related investigations conducted by a large sample of child welfare agencies in Canada.» (p. ix)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The FNCIS‑2008 [First Nations Component of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect] is the largest study of child welfare investigations involving First Nations children ever conducted in Canada. The study analyses CIS‑2008 data which includes investigations involving First Nations children that were conducted by 89 provincial/territorial agencies and 22 First Nations and urban Aboriginal agencies. The sample analyzed by the FNCIS‑2008 includes information on 3,106 investigations involving First Nations children and families living in reserve communities and off-reserve areas; these data are compared with information about 12,240 investigations involving non-Aboriginal children.» (p. xi)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In the population served by sampled agencies, the rate of child maltreatment-related investigations involving First Nations children was higher than the rate of investigations involving non-Aboriginal children. […] Data on workers’ concerns about caregiver risk factors suggest that the difference in First Nations and non-Aboriginal investigation rates for the population served by sampled agencies is linked to caregiver risk factor profiles. Workers indicated concerns about multiple caregiver risk factors in a greater proportion of First Nations than non-Aboriginal investigations; the risk factors commonly identified in First Nations investigations included substance abuse, domestic violence, social isolation, and caregiver history of foster care/group home. [...] Data on family and household structure point to factors which may further strain the abilities of some caregivers involved in First Nations investigations to adequately protect and nurture their children. These data suggest that family and household structural factors may also contribute to the high rates of investigations in the First Nations population served by sampled agencies.» (p. xi-xiv)