’Between Rage and Love’: Disidentifications Among Racialized, Ethnicized, and Colonized Allosexual Activists in Montreal

’Between Rage and Love’: Disidentifications Among Racialized, Ethnicized, and Colonized Allosexual Activists in Montreal

’Between Rage and Love’: Disidentifications Among Racialized, Ethnicized, and Colonized Allosexual Activists in Montreal

’Between Rage and Love’: Disidentifications Among Racialized, Ethnicized, and Colonized Allosexual Activists in Montreals

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [12031]

Wong, Alan. 2013. «’Between Rage and Love’: Disidentifications Among Racialized, Ethnicized, and Colonized Allosexual Activists in Montreal». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université Concordia, Programme individualisé spécial.

Accéder à la publication

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This dissertation is an interdisciplinary analysis of activists in contemporary Montreal whose bodies are marked by the intersections of sexuality, race, ethnicity, colonization, gender, and class.» (p. iii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Of the 48 narrators interviewed for this project, eight appear here in its final written form. The narratives analyzed were selected first for the quality and richness of their content and for the esteemed profiles of the narrators in the activist community.» (p. 53)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Within these spaces, we discover meaningful ways to belong without subjecting ourselves to the discursive demands of identification or non-identification. By focusing my study on three institutional aspects of our lives—family, citizenship, and activism—I show how our histories provide us with citations that disrupt the dominant narratives that aim to structure our lives in increasingly invasive, oppressive, and violent ways. In this respect, Montreal is an intriguing site for such disruptions to take place: a multicultural city in the North/West built on colonized land wherein sexual rights and freedoms commingle with language and nationalist politics to become a constant source of tension among its denizens. Thus, I argue that an expression of affect and emotion produced within a disidentifactory space is vital for minoritized subjects to negotiate this messiness, for disidentification itself is a messy process. I conclude by demonstrating that engaging with this messy process is necessary to the production of new forms of sociality, laying the path to a hopeful future that Muñoz calls ‘queer utopia.’» (p. iii)