Bodies that Care: a Microethnography of Family Caregivers of Older Adults

Bodies that Care: a Microethnography of Family Caregivers of Older Adults

Bodies that Care: a Microethnography of Family Caregivers of Older Adults

Bodies that Care: a Microethnography of Family Caregivers of Older Adultss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [12018]

Silverman, Marjorie. 2013. «Bodies that Care: a Microethnography of Family Caregivers of Older Adults». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université McGill, École de service social.

Accéder à la publication

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study examines the lived reality of women caregivers of older adults.» (p. 5)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The central research question is – What do women caregivers’ expressions and actions reveal about the lived experience of care to older adults? The following sub-questions aim to explore further the everyday reality of family care provision. How might women caregivers’ daily actions, movements and expressions be understood? What occurs during caregiving encounters? Does the body reveal information about the lived experience of caregiving that language does not? What role does gender play in women caregivers’ daily actions, movements and expressions?» (p. 85)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«I interpreted my research question through a microethnographic lens, and as such I designed a project that allowed me to observe caregiving in action, within the caregiver and care receiver’s home setting. I made regular visits to each caregiver’s home over a period of time, observing and videotaping during one hour at a time, and subsequently watching and rewatching the footage to analyze the caregiver’s nonverbal and verbal action.» (p. 93-94) «In total, I worked with five caregiver - care receiver dyads throughout the course of the research.» (p. 98)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«[T]he research provides a new account of family caregiving. Grounded in a conceptual framework of embodiment, as articulated by social theorists Pierre Bourdieu and Erving Goffman, the data illustrates that seemingly banal gestures and expressions expose the intimate, often hidden, reality of caregiving. The findings reveal a gendered caregiver habitus characterized by emotional labour, performance, body management, health divestment, and vacillating boundaries between the caregiver and care receiver. The project validates the everyday experiences of women caregivers, proposes recommendations for improved clinical practice, and bridges scholarship on caregiving and the sociology of the body.» (p. 5)