The Use of Cooperative and Surrogate Alliances during Naturalistic Polyadic Family Conflicts

The Use of Cooperative and Surrogate Alliances during Naturalistic Polyadic Family Conflicts

The Use of Cooperative and Surrogate Alliances during Naturalistic Polyadic Family Conflicts

The Use of Cooperative and Surrogate Alliances during Naturalistic Polyadic Family Conflictss

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Référence bibliographique [12002]

Persram, Ryan. 2013. «The Use of Cooperative and Surrogate Alliances during Naturalistic Polyadic Family Conflicts». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département des sciences de l’éducation.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he purpose of this study was to investigate the nature and dynamics of alliances in polyadic family conflict.» (p. 21-22)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Using an extension of Black and Baumgartner’s (1983) theory, the following research questions will be investigated:

1. Given that at least one or both siblings are involved in the conflict, which parent enters into conflict more often and what role (e.g., alliance, mediator, judge) do they often take?
2. How often do alliances form in family conflict?
3. Who are the common family members within an alliance and with whom do they side?
4. What types of conflicts (e.g., ownership, aggressive acts) elicit alliances?
5. What is the association between alliances and the outcomes of conflicts?
6. Is there a typology of alliances that identifies two sub-types of alliances (i.e., cooperative and surrogate) that depend on the level of support it provides?
7. What resources do family members use when alliances are formed?» (p. 25)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The study included 39 lower- and middle-class Caucasian families with two parents and at least two children. The families were recruited from a medium-sized industrial city in southwestern Ontario, Canada. […] The majority of families (n = 32) participated in six sessions conducted at home, while the rest (n = 7) were observed for seven sessions. Each family was observed for 90 minutes in each session, providing a total of 9 hours for six sessions and 10.5 hours for seven sessions.» (p. 27-28)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The findings revealed that despite all family members being involved in polyadic conflicts, children tended to be initiators, while parents became involved as additional parties. Alliances occurred more often than the other additional party roles, were likely to be formed when conflicts arose about obnoxious behaviours, and often resulted in the alliance achieving their goals and winning the conflict. Intergenerational alliances (i.e., parent-child) were more likely to be formed than intra-generational alliances (e.g., parental). A preliminary content analysis found that cooperative and surrogate alliances were quantitatively different with respect to the number of turns that allies used when supporting a combatant. Moreover, rule enforcement, control, informational, repetition, and induction were identified as resources that allies used to support their side.» (p. iii)