Integrating Rights and Duties: Achieving Children’s Autonomy in a Culturally Diverse World

Integrating Rights and Duties: Achieving Children’s Autonomy in a Culturally Diverse World

Integrating Rights and Duties: Achieving Children’s Autonomy in a Culturally Diverse World

Integrating Rights and Duties: Achieving Children’s Autonomy in a Culturally Diverse Worlds

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Référence bibliographique [11999]

Nnadozie, Ugochi. 2011. «Integrating Rights and Duties: Achieving Children’s Autonomy in a Culturally Diverse World». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université McGill, Faculté de droit.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This thesis reviews the current understanding of autonomy rights of the child as communicated by the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). It examines whether this conception is effective in achieving the fulfilment of the autonomy rights of the child, as well as in responding to the key challenges in the realisation of these rights within some jurisdictions. It proposes a critical look at the negotiations and drafting process of the Convention on the Rights of the Child in order to develop and foster a better appreciation of the basis of the current understanding and, therefore, the existing challenges in implementation. It suggests that there is a need to re-conceive the autonomy rights for children by integrating the notion of duties. Using the example of the Africa Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (ACRWC), it explores the advantages of such an approach.» (p. i)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«Recognising duties for children within the children’s rights discourse will achieve several goals. First, it will help bolster the support that CRC has provided for families by ensuring the stability and continuity of the family by emphasising mutuality and interdependence within the family. Second, it will help direct attention to all the demonstrated benefits to the child’s development. Third, it will also make the CRC more relevant to regions that already support child’s autonomy through duties, thereby ensuring the enhanced legitimacy and acceptability of the CRC within these regions. Fourth, it will improve the implementation efforts of countries that emphasize duty and interdependence.» (p. 151)