Global Health and Policy Translation: Women’s Embodied Experience of Breastfeeding in Quebec

Global Health and Policy Translation: Women’s Embodied Experience of Breastfeeding in Quebec

Global Health and Policy Translation: Women’s Embodied Experience of Breastfeeding in Quebec

Global Health and Policy Translation: Women’s Embodied Experience of Breastfeeding in Quebecs

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Référence bibliographique [11993]

Molino, Luisa. 2012. «Global Health and Policy Translation: Women’s Embodied Experience of Breastfeeding in Quebec». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université McGill, Département de psychiatrie.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The purpose of my research is to generate knowledge that identifies women’s experiences of infant feeding in Québec, within the context of health services guided by the provincial LD [lignes directrices] policy and guidelines. Furthermore, this study aims to explore the multiple forces that shape women’s experience of infant feeding, thus shedding some light on the incongruence between policy and practices in Quebec.» (p. 37)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«[M]y research […] will be guided by the following research questions:
1. How do public health breastfeeding policies shape and impact women’s perceptions of their bodies, identity and choices within the context of infant feeding decisions in Quebec?
2. How do women interpret, negotiate and/or resist current policy-driven dominant formal and socio-culturally shared informal infant feeding recommendations?» (p. 38)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Le présent mémoire de maîtrise est basé sur la participation de 52 femmes du Québec dans des discussions de groupe focales (focus group).

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Although most participants considered infant feeding methods to be a personal choice, residing within a woman’s domain, many factors ultimately played a role in influencing both the decision and the outcome of breastfeeding duration.» (p. 47) «The findings indicate that women’s choices, practices and experience of infant feeding result from the interaction of personal goals and expectations with the norms dominant in the system of social relations in which women are immersed. The data suggest that women’s experience of feeding and self-definition of best mothering practices are profoundly influenced by current biomedical and policy discourses on infant feeding. However, in view of the persistence of formula culture, general lack of informal support and BF [breastfeading] role models among personal networks, initiating and maintaining BF (attaining current formal feeding recommendations) has proved to be a very challenging bodily, emotional, and social experience for most mothers, and for first time mothers in particular. Hence, HPs [Heath care professionnal] and the quality of formal support services women received played a crucial role in helping mothers to overcome the challenges of BF initiation and in turn to develop strategies to sustain BF longer.» (p. 102)