“That’s just what people think of a hockey player, right?”: Manifestations of Masculinity among Major Junior Ice Hockey Players

“That’s just what people think of a hockey player, right?”: Manifestations of Masculinity among Major Junior Ice Hockey Players

“That’s just what people think of a hockey player, right?”: Manifestations of Masculinity among Major Junior Ice Hockey Players

“That’s just what people think of a hockey player, right?”: Manifestations of Masculinity among Major Junior Ice Hockey Playerss

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Référence bibliographique [11984]

MacDonald, Cheryl. 2012. «“That’s just what people think of a hockey player, right?”: Manifestations of Masculinity among Major Junior Ice Hockey Players». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département de sociologie.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«My goal in completing this research was to establish and understand the ways in which masculinity is manifested in the lives of Junior hockey players while keeping the concept of hegemonic masculinity in mind to determine how it holds up in their accounts of masculinity.» (p. 39)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The sample population for this study consists of one entire Canadian Junior ice hockey team and their head coach.» (p. 40)

Instruments :
Questionnaire
Guide d’entretien semi-directif


Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The players discussed family in terms of what their families expect of them and in terms of being away from home. Many players said that the worst or most difficult part about playing Junior hockey is having to be away from home.» (p. 89) «The other recurring theme with regards to family was the families’ expectations of the players. We discussed what their families expected of them as individuals and as hockey players. The players unanimously agreed that their families, and especially their mothers, expected them to be good, hardworking people. » (p. 92) «The final sub-theme in relation to family and expectations is the family’s expectations—or lack thereof—in relation to the players’ hockey careers. The majority of players said that they felt as though their families had no real expectations of them in hockey.» (p. 93) «While the qualities that the players listed as making a man successful were non-gender oriented, the scenarios they described were typically masculine. They want to provide for a family, have money, be entrepreneurs.» (p. 112)