Are Infants Discriminatory Learners and Helpers? The Influence of a Model’s Reliability on Infants’ Selective Trust

Are Infants Discriminatory Learners and Helpers? The Influence of a Model’s Reliability on Infants’ Selective Trust

Are Infants Discriminatory Learners and Helpers? The Influence of a Model’s Reliability on Infants’ Selective Trust

Are Infants Discriminatory Learners and Helpers? The Influence of a Model’s Reliability on Infants’ Selective Trusts

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Référence bibliographique [11928]

Brooker, Ivy. 2013. «Are Infants Discriminatory Learners and Helpers? The Influence of a Model’s Reliability on Infants’ Selective Trust». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département de psychologie.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
Dans le troisième article de cette thèse, l’auteure écrit que «a claim has been made that a caregiver who possesses these attributes [consistent responsiveness and emotional availability] will be ’regarded as trustworthy in the epistemic as well as the emotional domain’ (Harris & Corriveau, 2011, p. 1181). The current study attempted to test this claim by examining how toddlers’ acceptance of information presented by their primary caregiver might vary as a function of that parent’s consistent behavior and consequent emotional reliability.» (p. 87) L’auteure ajoute également que l’étude visait à examiner «how children would generalize their caregiver’s history of emotional reliability to non-learning contexts and thus modify their behavior, specifically during instrumental helping tasks.» (p. 92)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«[I]t was hypothesized that children of more sensitive and responsive parents would be more likely to imitate them and learn from them.» (91)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
La troisième étude de cette thèse est basée sur l’observation des interactions entre «[f]orty-two primary caregivers and their 24-month-old infants.» (p. 94)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


À la lumière de sa troisième étude, l’auteure conclut que «a history of sensitive and responsive parenting behavior will instill a sense of epistemic trust in a child and impact their willingness to learn from, as well as help and imitate their parent. Despite their strong tendency to learn from adults, particularly within a pedagogical context, children were less likely to learn from a parent characterized as less sensitive and responsive within a laboratory setting. This effect was found with respect to children’s word learning. Children’s outcomes were not a result of variability in primary caregivers’ teaching skills, as parents were given and adhered to a standardized script.» (p. 109) Elle ajoute que «children were not as willing to learn a novel word from a less responsive caregiver. When parent-child interaction is less optimal due to a parent’s lack of responsiveness, there may be fewer verbal exchanges between the dyad including less labeling of objects in the child’s environment that could ultimately result in a child’s reduced ability to learn new words and consequently, a smaller lexical repertoire (Chazan-Cohen et al., 2009; Tomasello & Farrar, 1986). Indeed, it was found that toddlers of more responsive and sensitive parents had a higher productive vocabulary.» (p. 109-110)