Quebec’s Distinct Welfare State: On Poverty Among Families with Children, Quebec and the Rest of Canada Have Taken Different Paths

Quebec’s Distinct Welfare State: On Poverty Among Families with Children, Quebec and the Rest of Canada Have Taken Different Paths

Quebec’s Distinct Welfare State: On Poverty Among Families with Children, Quebec and the Rest of Canada Have Taken Different Paths

Quebec’s Distinct Welfare State: On Poverty Among Families with Children, Quebec and the Rest of Canada Have Taken Different Pathss

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Référence bibliographique [11865]

Raiq, Hicham, Bernard, Paul et Van Den Berg, Axel. 2012. «Quebec’s Distinct Welfare State: On Poverty Among Families with Children, Quebec and the Rest of Canada Have Taken Different Paths ». Inroads: A Journal of Opinion, no 31, p. 59-68.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[This study takes] a closer look at the effect of Quebec’s policies to combat poverty among families with children on poverty rates of different family types.» (p. 59)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«[H]ow does Quebec stack up against the other Canadian provinces and other countries when it cornes to poverty rates among different types of families?» (p. 60)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«We use data from the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS), the current goId standard for international income comparisons, offering more than 200 demographic and income variables from more than 30 countries. The data are presented for five-year intervals starting in 1990 up until the latest year with fully available data (2004-05).» (p. 62)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The standard poverty rate for single-parent families is an important exception, but even in that respect Quebec’s performance compares reasonably well with the reputedly more generous European conservative welfare states. Note also that Quebec has accomplished all this with a combination of greater generosity in its social programs and an approach intended to facilitate combining market employment and childcare for women with children, a typically social democratic strategy. In other words, with respect to the policies and outcomes we have considered here, Quebec seems to have effectively moved from a typical liberal welfare state to what looks an awful lot like a social democratic one. […] The fact remains that Quebec appears to have come a long way from its erstwhile liberal policy regime. The other provinces in Canada, and possibly even some of the other European countries, could do worse than to investigate exactly how Quebec was able to pull this off.» (p. 67)