Immigrant Status, Antenatal Depressive Symptoms, and Frequency and Source of Violence: What’s the Relationship?

Immigrant Status, Antenatal Depressive Symptoms, and Frequency and Source of Violence: What’s the Relationship?

Immigrant Status, Antenatal Depressive Symptoms, and Frequency and Source of Violence: What’s the Relationship?

Immigrant Status, Antenatal Depressive Symptoms, and Frequency and Source of Violence: What’s the Relationship?s

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [11823]

Miszkurka, Malgorzata, Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria et Goulet, Lise. 2012. «Immigrant Status, Antenatal Depressive Symptoms, and Frequency and Source of Violence: What’s the Relationship? ». Archives of Women’s Mental Health, vol. 15, no 5, p. 387-396.

Accéder à la publication

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objectives of this study are to describe the phenomenon of violence during pregnancy and to examine the association between the experience of violence since the beginning of pregnancy and the prevalence of antenatal depressive symptoms (ADS) while taking into account immigrant status of pregnant women residing in the Montreal area.» (p. 388)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Data originated from a study conducted in four large maternity Hospitals [in Montréal, Canada]. Statistical analyses were performed on the final sample for which the outcome measure was available, consisting of 5,162 pregnant women, with 1,400 being born outside of Canada.» (p. 388)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This study adds evidence to document the adverse effects of experiencing violence during pregnancy on mental health and adds knowledge on the pervasive effects of violence from all sources in both immigrant and Canadian-born pregnant women. [The] results are not only alarming with regard to the pregnant mother’s antenatal health and further birth outcomes but also to the prognosis for the postpartum period.» (p. 391) «Although the effect of violence on depression did not differ with regard to immigrant status, long-term immigrant women reported the highest prevalence of violence. There is a gap in knowledge considering the consistently lower reports of violence in immigrant women and the dose–response resembling relationship between violence and the length of stay. A complex interplay of individual characteristics and immigration-related circumstances may, in fact, affect the way that immigrant women report violence. These may include cultural aspects where violence is differentially perceived, understood, or socially accepted. Fear of reporting due to lack of understanding of the referral and legal system or due to immigrant status issues enlarges the barriers to reporting (Raj and Silverman 2002).» (p. 393)