Food Insecurity and Children’s Mental Health: A Prospective Birth Cohort Study

Food Insecurity and Children’s Mental Health: A Prospective Birth Cohort Study

Food Insecurity and Children’s Mental Health: A Prospective Birth Cohort Study

Food Insecurity and Children’s Mental Health: A Prospective Birth Cohort Studys

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [11819]

Melchior, Maria, Chastang, Jean-François, Falissard, Bruno, Galera, Cédric, Tremblay, Richard E., Côté, Sylvana M. et Boivin, Michel. 2012. «Food Insecurity and Children’s Mental Health: A Prospective Birth Cohort Study ». PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no 12, p. 1-7.

Accéder à la publication

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In the present study, we test the relationship between food insecurity in early childhood (before age 4 1/2) and children’s symptoms of depression/anxiety, aggression, and hyperactivity/inattention up to age 8, accounting for child and familial characteristics which may be associated with food insecurity and children’s mental health: child’s sex, immigrant status, family structure, maternal age at child’s birth, family income, maternal and paternal education, prenatal tobacco exposure, maternal and paternal depression, family functioning and negative parenting.» (p. 1-2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Data for this study come from the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD) study, which follows a representative cohort of 2120 children born in the Canadian province of Québec in 1997–1998. […] The present analysis is based on 1682 children […].» (p. 2)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Our finding contributes to growing scientific evidence of the impact of food insecurity on children’s well-being, and suggests that exposure very early in life can have lasting effects on development.» (p. 4) «The association between food insecurity and children’s behaviour may reflect several mechanisms. First, food insecure families are disproportionately exposed to multiple risks which can impair children’s development and mental health, including poverty, marital discord, single parenthood, violence, parental substance abuse and psychopathogy. Our analyses are controlled for income, family structure and functioning, as well as parental psychopathology and attitude towards children, but we cannot entirely rule out the possibility of residual confounding, whereby the association between food insecurity and children’s behaviour is not causal but rather reflects the co-occurrence of other risk factors. Second, through psychological pathways, food insecurity early in life may lead to weak attachment between parents and children, which can have negative consequences on children’s mental health later on. Third, food insecurity may be associated with maternal depression, which, in turn, impacts on child mental health. Fourth, food insecurity may directly predict the occurrence of behavioural difficulties through inadequate nutrition.» (p. 6)