The Migration Decisions of Physicians In Canada: The Roles of Immigrant Status and Spousal Characteristics

The Migration Decisions of Physicians In Canada: The Roles of Immigrant Status and Spousal Characteristics

The Migration Decisions of Physicians In Canada: The Roles of Immigrant Status and Spousal Characteristics

The Migration Decisions of Physicians In Canada: The Roles of Immigrant Status and Spousal Characteristicss

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Référence bibliographique [11816]

McDonald, James Ted et Worswick, Christopher. 2012. «The Migration Decisions of Physicians In Canada: The Roles of Immigrant Status and Spousal Characteristics ». Social Science and Medecine, vol. 75, no 9, p. 1581-1588.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In this paper, we […] study the geographic mobility of immigrant and non-immigrant physicians.» (p. 1582)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The data used in the estimation come from the 1991, 1996, 2001 and 2006 Canadian Census 20% confidential master files accessed through the University of New Brunswick Research Data Centre (RDC).» (p. 1582) Plusieurs données concernent le Québec.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«An important dimension of the migration decision is family composition, since the decision to move has clear implications for a physician’s spouse and other family members where present (Jacobsen & Levin, 1997, 2000; Pixley, 2008).» (p. 1582) Les résultats montrent que «both immigrant and non-immigrant couples have lower outmigration rates than corresponding immigrant and non-immigrant individuals with no spouse present.» (p. 1585) «Where a spouse is present in the family, his or her characteristics are also found to be important determinants of the decision to move. A spouse holding a Bachelor’s degree is associated with lower outmigration from large cities […] and a higher degree is associated with higher outmigration from rural areas. […] Female physicians and French-speaking physicians resident in large cities in Quebec are also less likely to move out of their region of residence.» (p. 1586)