Families’ and Decision Makers’ Experiences With Mental Health Care Reform: The Challenge of Collaboration

Families’ and Decision Makers’ Experiences With Mental Health Care Reform: The Challenge of Collaboration

Families’ and Decision Makers’ Experiences With Mental Health Care Reform: The Challenge of Collaboration

Families’ and Decision Makers’ Experiences With Mental Health Care Reform: The Challenge of Collaborations

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Référence bibliographique [11798]

Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie, Bonin, Jean-Pierre, Bonneville-Roussy, Arielle, Briand, Catherine, Perreault, Michel, Piat, Myra, Lesage, Alain, Racine, Hélène, Laroche, Dominique et Cyr, Guylaine. 2012. «Families’ and Decision Makers’ Experiences With Mental Health Care Reform: The Challenge of Collaboration ». Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, vol. 26, no 4, p. e41-e50.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The aims of this study are to describe how families and decision makers perceive collaboration in the context of a major transformation of mental health services and to identify the factors that facilitate and hinder family collaboration.» (p. e43)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«A qualitative descriptive study was performed in 2009–2010 in Québec. Two series of six focus groups (with 7 to 12 participants) were conducted, one with 54 family members in June 2009 and another with 24 of these family members 18 months later, in November 2010. As well, 22 […] individual interviews were conducted with key decision makers in 2009.» (p. e44)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«[F]amily members and decision makers in this study agreed that collaboration should be fostered between families and the health care system. According to decision makers, family collaboration is one of the core concepts of the action plan underlying the MHAP [Mental Health Action Plan] transformation. […] In this study, the collaborative practices of mental health practitioners seemed to vary greatly from person to person. A number of families mentioned being ignored in the treatment process, even though their collaboration could have been beneficial for the patient’s recovery. […] With the MHAP and its emphasis on family inclusion in treatment, there is a pressure for good collaborative practices to be the norm rather than the exception. […] Mental health professionals who did not wish to disclose confidential information were perceived by families as reluctant to collaborate. […] In this study, decision makers pointed out that there is no law preventing practitioners from listening to families, provided they do not disclose confidential information about the patient. […] In this study, most of the families reported no meaningful changes in terms of their collaboration with health care practitioners.» (p. e47-e48)