Impact of a College Student Academic Mentoring Program on Perceived Parental and Teacher Educational Involvement

Impact of a College Student Academic Mentoring Program on Perceived Parental and Teacher Educational Involvement

Impact of a College Student Academic Mentoring Program on Perceived Parental and Teacher Educational Involvement

Impact of a College Student Academic Mentoring Program on Perceived Parental and Teacher Educational Involvements

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Référence bibliographique [11793]

Larose, Simon, Tarabulsy, George M., Harvey, Marylou, Guay, Frédéric, Deschenes, Claire, Cyrenne, Diane et Garceau, Odette. 2012. «Impact of a College Student Academic Mentoring Program on Perceived Parental and Teacher Educational Involvement ». Journal of Applied Social Psychology, vol. 42, no 9, p. 2137-2162.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he first goal of our study is to test the hypothesis of a causal link between late adolescents’ participation in a structured peer mentoring program during their first year of college and their perceptions of parent and teacher educational involvement. The second goal is to explore the role of interpersonal mentor behaviors and quality of the mentor–protégé relationship on protégé perceptions of parent and teacher involvement. These goals were pursued in the context of the evaluation of the MIRES program (translated from French as “Mentoring to increase the integration and success of science students”), which aims at encouraging students to persevere in postsecondary mathematics, science, and technology (MST) programs of study.» (p. 2138)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The target sample for this study included [307] students newly admitted into science and technology programs in Fall 2006 at two colleges in the Québec City area. These students were [participating] in the MIRES program.» (p. 2143)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The present findings have significant implications for academic mentoring programs. First, they call on program practitioners to reflect on ways of getting parents and teachers involved in young people’s academic development. […] By communicating the nature and goals of the program and presenting positive feedback of protégés and mentors participating in the mentoring experience, program practitioners can help parents and teachers better understand how mentoring and parental interventions complement one another. Second, the findings suggest that it may be useful to assist and train mentors on how to best support protégé–parent and protégé–teacher relationships. [M]entors can interact directly with parents and teachers, or indirectly through their actions with their protégés. […]. During mentoring meetings, mentors can express the values shared by parents and teachers, reinforce certain codes of conduct, and directly encourage protégés to seek support from their parents and teachers when they face challenges. Third, the findings also suggest paying special attention to the presence and development of two mentoring skills that seem to impact youth social development: the mentors’ capacity for autonomy support, and their ability to structure the mentoring relationship.» (p. 2158-2159)