Role Conflict and Self-Efficacy Among Employed Parents: Examining Complex Statistical Interactions

Role Conflict and Self-Efficacy Among Employed Parents: Examining Complex Statistical Interactions

Role Conflict and Self-Efficacy Among Employed Parents: Examining Complex Statistical Interactions

Role Conflict and Self-Efficacy Among Employed Parents: Examining Complex Statistical Interactionss

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Référence bibliographique [11786]

Houle, Lucie, Chiocchio, François, Favreau, Olga E. et Villeneuve, Martine. 2012. «Role Conflict and Self-Efficacy Among Employed Parents: Examining Complex Statistical Interactions ». Gender, Work and Organization, vol. 19, no 6, p. 592-614.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study explores the effects of personal and social resources on perceptions of work and family role conflict among employed parents who occupy full-time management and professional positions.» (p. 596)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«A greater sense of efficacy in managing work and family demands will be associated with lower levels of work and family role conflict […] Social support will moderate the relationship between self-efficacy and work and family role conflict. […] Gender will moderate the relations among (a) self-efficacy and work and family role conflict, (b) social support and work and family role conflict and (c) self-efficacy, social support and work and family role conflict.» (p. 596)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This study was part of a larger project on the effects of managing work and family in a Canadian financial institution. […] The resulting sample of 414 participants included 274 (66%) women and 140 (34%) men. On average they had 1.9 children [...] and 78 per cent occupied middle level positions.» (p. 596-597)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«[A]mong all the variables considered in our model, self-efficacy was the strongest predictor of interference, accounting for 24 and 20 per cent of the variance in FIW [family interfering with work] and WIF [family interfering with work], respectively. This is an important contribution because so faire research on personal resources and work and family role conflict has focused predominantly on personal dispositions and personal traits such as attachment styles, hardiness and the big five personality dimensions […] Our findings also indicate that gender plays a critical yet intricate role in the search for factors that contribute to the successful management of work and family roles. […] Beyond creating a contrast and informing us about the specific needs of men and women, these findings also speak, albeit indirectly, of the possible difficulties that employed mothers face as they try to reconcile their personal choices with society’s expectations.» (p. 605-606)