Life Course Socioeconomic Position and Major Depression in Canada

Life Course Socioeconomic Position and Major Depression in Canada

Life Course Socioeconomic Position and Major Depression in Canada

Life Course Socioeconomic Position and Major Depression in Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [11689]

Park, Alison. 2010. «Life Course Socioeconomic Position and Major Depression in Canada». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université McGill, Département d’épidémiologie, biostatistique et santé au travail.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The primary objective of this study is to estimate the relationship between parents’ education (mother’s education and father’s education) and MDE [major depressive episode]. […] A second objective is to estimate the potential mediating effects of ACEs [adverse childhood experience], and various adult risk factors, including adult SEP [socioeconomic position] (education, student status, income, employment status), psychosocial resources (chronic stress and mastery), and poor physical health (number of chronic conditions).» (p. 30)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Based on the literature supporting a positive relationship between higher education and better health and mental health, we hypothesize that higher parental education will have a protective effect on the mental health of their adult offspring. […] Following from previous literature citing the predictive power of adult SEP, ACEs, psychosocial resources, and poor physical health for poor adult mental health, we hypothesize that some of the relationship between parents’ education and adult depression will be mediated by these risk- factors. However, we expect that parents’ education will retain an independent effect on adult depression in this sample of young adults.» (p. 30)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Data for this study were obtained from the National Population Health Survey (NPHS), which is a nationally representative longitudinal household survey conducted by Statistics Canada. […] The data presented in this paper are from a subsample of 1,267 eligible individuals (624 female and 643 male).» (p. 32-33)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Using a large nationally-representative sample this study assessed the differential impact of maternal and paternal education on young adult depression in Canada. There are two main findings from this study. The first finding suggests that there is a differential effect of parental education, such that mother’s education predicted adult depression and father’s education did not. The second main finding suggests that the effect of mother’s education seems to be independent of a number of early-life and adult risk factors. Adverse childhood experiences did not play a mediating role in the effect of low maternal education on adult depression. Likewise, none of the adult risk factors for depression mediated the effect of low maternal education. Surprisingly, it appears that the education level, along with employment status and income adequacy, do not play a mediating role in the effect of maternal education on young adult depression. However, several of the adverse childhood experiences, as well as the young adult’s student status, income adequacy, and chronic stress, had strong independent effects on depression. According to the results of this study, parental education (specifically low maternal education) has a direct effect on young adult mental health outcomes.» (p. 53)