The Importance of Understanding the Academic Emotions of High School Students at Risk for Academic Failure

The Importance of Understanding the Academic Emotions of High School Students at Risk for Academic Failure

The Importance of Understanding the Academic Emotions of High School Students at Risk for Academic Failure

The Importance of Understanding the Academic Emotions of High School Students at Risk for Academic Failures

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Référence bibliographique [11628]

Goldberg, Daniella. 2012. «The Importance of Understanding the Academic Emotions of High School Students at Risk for Academic Failure». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Universtié McGill, Département de psychopédagogie et counseling.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The current study extends academic emotions research by looking at how appraisals of competency and value relate to the emotional experiences of inner-city high school students.» (p. 22)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The study hypotheses were as follows:
1) It was hypothesized that value would predict emotions. More specifically that high value (interest, value, usefulness) would relate positively to enjoyment, anger, anxiety and anxiety, while low levels of value would relate positively to boredom.
2) It was hypothesized that self-concept would predict emotions. More specifically, students with high self-concept would report more enjoyment, while students with a low self-concept would report more anxiety and anger. Students who were more bored would have lower self-concepts.
3) It was hypothesized that there would be an interaction between self-concept and value; students who reported high self-concept and value would report more enjoyment, while students with low self-concept, but high value, would report more anxiety and anger. Boredom would be predicted by low levels of both self-concept and value.» (p. 23-24)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Forty- three participants were recruited from two samples: twenty-three from the CN Adopt-an Alouette program and twenty from an inner-city high school in Montreal. Participants were between 12-19 years old, with an overall mean age of 16.» (p. 24)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Inquiry into the home environment is important because of the powerful social role that parents have in their child’s social-emotional development (Eccles & Wigfield, 2002; Gutman, Sameroff, & Eccles, 2002). Many risk factors in the home environment have deleterious effects on the scholastic achievement of students; some of these risks include maternal education, occupational prestige, income, family structure, neighbourhood and cultural background (Taylor et al., 2004). All of these variables have been known to negatively relate to many childhood outcomes, including mental and physical health, educational and vocational pursuits, and psychosocial well-being (Boardman & Robert, 2012; Boxer, Goldstein, Delorenzo, Savoy, & Mercado, 2011; Frome & Eccles, 1998).» (p. 20) À la lumière de ses recherches, l’auteure conclut que «[r]esults of this study corroborate the utility of The Control-Value Theory of Academic Emotions, and illustrate its efficacy in understanding the relationship between how students think and feel about school. Although the current sample was not as at-risk as initially anticipated, the results from this study support the intricate and reciprocal relationships that exist between thoughts of competency and interest, and emotions.» (p. 57-58)