Lone Mothers and Neoliberal ’Discipline’: A Case Study of a Canadian Low-Income Housing Project

Lone Mothers and Neoliberal ’Discipline’: A Case Study of a Canadian Low-Income Housing Project

Lone Mothers and Neoliberal ’Discipline’: A Case Study of a Canadian Low-Income Housing Project

Lone Mothers and Neoliberal ’Discipline’: A Case Study of a Canadian Low-Income Housing Projects

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [11615]

Ducey, Kimberley Anne. 2013. «Lone Mothers and Neoliberal ’Discipline’: A Case Study of a Canadian Low-Income Housing Project». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université McGill, Département de sociologie.

Accéder à la publication

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study examines how neoliberalism as an ideology and practice infiltrates Hawthorne House [Hawthorne House is a housing project for low-income lone mothers studying and living in Canada.] as officials attempt to produce self-governing residents who are ‘obliged to be free’ and self-regulate.» (p. i)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur la participation de 36 mères monoparentales canadiennes. «Study participants were enlisted through parishes, government departments, schools, community centers, social service agencies, hospitals, and medical offices.» (p. 39) Également, «[t]his dissertation draws on in-depth interviews with residents, officials, and volunteers; field observations; and an examination of textual sources (e.g., brochures, posters) in order to assess the impact of the program on the residents’ quality of life.» (p. i)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«In its penetration of Hawthorne House, neoliberalism found officials seemingly willing to endorse individualization and reduced collective security, while supporting a strong market ethos. Officials pathologized and individualized residents, while generally ignoring social inequalities that helped account for the challenges residents faced. Economic survival must be achieved differently if it is to be authentic and enduring. Rhetoric that denies or ignores social marginalization and structural barriers, and welfare state retrenchment that works in tandem with such indifference and/or antipathy, must be challenged. Lone mothers must be authentically empowered and assisted in their struggles against sexist, classist, racist, and other authoritarian types of oppression.» (p. 266)