The Influence of Poverty and Social Support on the Perceived Health of Children Born to Minority Migrant Mothers

The Influence of Poverty and Social Support on the Perceived Health of Children Born to Minority Migrant Mothers

The Influence of Poverty and Social Support on the Perceived Health of Children Born to Minority Migrant Mothers

The Influence of Poverty and Social Support on the Perceived Health of Children Born to Minority Migrant Motherss

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«We examined differences in children’s health status at 17 months of age, as perceived by their mother, of children born to minority migrant mothers compared with children born to Canadian-born mothers, while exploring the specific contributions of social support and a longitudinal measure of poverty on perceived child health.» (p. 187)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The differential exposure hypothesis suggests that one group may be in worse health than the other due to exposure to more conditions that have negative influences on health. Accounting for the differences in exposure to poverty and low social support between children of immigrant and those of Canadian-born mothers would thus explain observed differences in health. The differential vulnerability hypothesis suggests that differences in health occur because the groups react differently when exposed to conditions that influence health. The latter hypothesis implies effect modification whereby children born to immigrant mothers and those born to Canadian-born mothers are expected to show different levels of risk depending on their level of exposure to poverty and low social support.» (p. 187)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Les données proviennent de l’Étude longitudinale du développement des enfants du Québec (ÉLDEQ)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«[W]e found that, on average, children of minority migrant mothers were more often perceived in less than excellent health compared to children of Canadian-born mothers. Exposure to sustained poverty (two consecutive years) and low social support at 17 months were more common among minority migrants than among Canadian-born mothers. However, accounting for these differences in exposure did not explain differences in perceived child health. We also found differences according to migration status in the associations of the combined exposure to low social support and sustained poverty with child’s health status. These findings support the vulnerability hypothesis whereby children of minority migrant mothers are perceived in worse health when they are exposed to both low social support and sustained poverty. This was true when compared to children of Canadian-born mothers in most favourable conditions (high social support and never poor) and to children of Canadian-born mothers in least favourable conditions (low social support and always poor). However, when in most favourable conditions (high social support and ‘never poor’), children of minority migrant mothers were perceived in better health than children of Canadian-born mothers with similar conditions.» (p. 195)