Kindergarten Self-Regulation as a Predictor of Body Mass Index and Sports Participation in Fourth Grade Students

Kindergarten Self-Regulation as a Predictor of Body Mass Index and Sports Participation in Fourth Grade Students

Kindergarten Self-Regulation as a Predictor of Body Mass Index and Sports Participation in Fourth Grade Students

Kindergarten Self-Regulation as a Predictor of Body Mass Index and Sports Participation in Fourth Grade Studentss

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Référence bibliographique [11490]

Piché, Genèvieve, Fitzpatrick, Caroline et Pagani, Linda S. 2012. «Kindergarten Self-Regulation as a Predictor of Body Mass Index and Sports Participation in Fourth Grade Students ». Mind, Brain, and Education, vol. 6, no 1, p. 19-26.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]his study addresses this hypothesis [children with poorer self-regulatory skills may have limited response inhibition to distractions and temptations, thereby increasing their inclination toward unhealthy behaviors that promote weight gain and sedentariness over time (Epstein, Salvy,Carr, Dearing, & Bickel, 2010) (p. 20)] by investigating the prospective associations between kindergarten teacher-rated self-regulation skills and fourth grade health-related outcomes.» (p. 20)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon utilisé est composé de 966 enfants et découle de l’Étude longitudinale du développement des enfants du Québec (ELDEQ).

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Selon les auteures, les résultats de cette étude «are consistent with previous findings suggesting that boys are more physically active than girls (Kohl & Hobbs, 1998). One hypothesis is that parents are more over-protective or less concerned about physical activity with girls than boys. A second hypothesis is that boys are being taught gender-stereotypic behaviors that encourage male sports participation. Also, the inverse association found between televiewing and sports participation was significant but small, which supports some previous work noting either nonsignificant or small effects (Iannotti et al., 2009; Marshall, Biddle, Gorely, Cameron, & Murdey, 2004; Nilsson et al., 2009).» (p. 23). À la lumière des résultats, elles concluent que «[c]hild differences in self-regulation may be considered to be partly genetic. Yet, self-control strategies may be learned at an early age, through parent–child activities or in the classroom environment. Therefore, because self-regulation is a malleable person-environment fit characteristic (Lillard & Else-Quest, 2006), promoting learning behavior at the beginning of children’s academic journey may help us prevent trends toward increasing sedentariness and weight gain.» (p. 25)