How Do Mothers and Fathers Who Have a Child with a Disability Describe their Adaptation/Transformation Process?

How Do Mothers and Fathers Who Have a Child with a Disability Describe their Adaptation/Transformation Process?

How Do Mothers and Fathers Who Have a Child with a Disability Describe their Adaptation/Transformation Process?

How Do Mothers and Fathers Who Have a Child with a Disability Describe their Adaptation/Transformation Process?s

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Référence bibliographique [11483]

Pelchat, Diane, Levert, Marie-Josée et Bourgeois-Guérin, Valérie. 2009. «How Do Mothers and Fathers Who Have a Child with a Disability Describe their Adaptation/Transformation Process? ». Journal of Child Health Care, vol. 13, no 3, p. 239-259.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The study explored similarities and differences in the adaptation/transformation process in mothers and fathers living with a child with cerebral palsy, on the individual, parental, marital and extrafamilial levels. Specifically, the research explored the differences and similarities between the perceptions of each parent, the adaptation strategies used by each parent and the transformations undergone by each parent.» (p. 241)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The sample comprised 13 couples with a child with cerebral palsy, recruited by resources at two hospital centers, one of them a pediatric hospital, and two rehabilitation centers in the Greater Montreal and Laurentian regions.» (p. 243)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«This study highlights the importance of raising awareness among health professionals about supporting parents as they accomplish a key adaptive task: assuming their normalcy. Parents feel stigmatized by society and have to undergo a normalization process in order to position their parenthood within a normative space at the individual, parental and marital levels as well as in relation to the extended family, their circle, social environment and health professionals. […] This study provides a fuller understanding of the adjustment or transformation process in fathers and mothers, the individual and family dynamic introduced by the birth of the child, the effects of the potential marginalization of these parents, and the differentiated ways in which fathers and mothers adjust to the experience of living with a child with a disability. The two parents share a common objective – the child’s autonomy – but there is a marked difference in the way that they pursue this goal. Mothers associate this autonomy with the relational and communicational aspect, with people’s acceptance of the child. For fathers, autonomy is connected with the child’s developmental progress. […] The importance of the complementarity and closeness between fathers and mothers in each of the adaptation/transformation subsystems, and the normalization process achieved through adaptation to difference in all subsystems, represent a key finding.» (p. 255-256)