Parents of a Disabled Child: Their Adaptative Process and an Early Intervention Program for Them

Parents of a Disabled Child: Their Adaptative Process and an Early Intervention Program for Them

Parents of a Disabled Child: Their Adaptative Process and an Early Intervention Program for Them

Parents of a Disabled Child: Their Adaptative Process and an Early Intervention Program for Thems

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Référence bibliographique [11475]

Pelchat, Diane. 1992. «Parents of a Disabled Child: Their Adaptative Process and an Early Intervention Program for Them ». Revue canadienne de santé mentale communautaire / Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health, vol. 11, no 1, p. 81-84.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study analyzes the parents’ adaptive process in the four months following the birth. It also offers an early intervention program based on a perdiodic evaluation of the parents’ adaptive capacities in the individual, parental, conjugal and interpersonal spheres.» (p. 81)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Five couples were recruited in Montreal hospitals. All were French-Canadians from a middle socioeconomic class; all had an infant with a cleft lip or cleft palate.» (p. 81)

Instruments :
- Guide d’entretien
- Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«This study shows that the intervention program can effectively help all parents in a similar situation, but not all parents to the same degree. The differences in effectiveness depend on the parent’s personalities, on personal and conjugal difficulties present before the birth, and on the care required by the baby. The main results of the research are noted in each of the four spheres of parent adaptation. In the individual sphere, it is clear that an intervention in this area has an impact on the other three: conjugal, parental and interpersonal. […] In the couple sphere, the most positive interventions were those which helped the spouses to understand their perception of the situation and to share their feelings. […] In the parental sphere, the most effective interventions were those which facilitated the expression of fears abour the care of the baby and those which helped the parents acknowledge not only the baby’s temperament and special need, but also the child’s attractive features such as lovely eyes or beautiful hands. […] In the interpersonal sphere, effective interventions allowed the parents to express their fear of relatives’ and others people’s reactions.» (p. 82-83)