Attributing Responsibility and Assessing Gravity in Wife Abuse Situations: A Comparative study of Police and Social Workers

Attributing Responsibility and Assessing Gravity in Wife Abuse Situations: A Comparative study of Police and Social Workers

Attributing Responsibility and Assessing Gravity in Wife Abuse Situations: A Comparative study of Police and Social Workers

Attributing Responsibility and Assessing Gravity in Wife Abuse Situations: A Comparative study of Police and Social Workerss

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Référence bibliographique [11407]

Home, Alice M. 1994. «Attributing Responsibility and Assessing Gravity in Wife Abuse Situations: A Comparative study of Police and Social Workers ». Journal of Social Service Research, vol. 19, no 1-2, p. 67-84.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study sought to compare police and social workers’ attributions of responsibility for domestic violence incidents and their judgments as to the gravity of those incidents. A second aim was to study the differential effect of some contextual factors on these two types of workers’ attribution and assessment in domestic violence incidents.» (p. 70)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The study sample therefore included 423 subjects, of which 235 were police officers, who represented 42% of the municipal police population. Almost 95% of the police subjects were men, 70% were under age 40 and 87% were living with a spouse. […] The 188 social workers making up the final sample represent nearly 52% of the target population.» (p. 71)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results show that social workers and police do indeed differ both in their attribution of responsibility and their assessment of gravity of domestic violence situations. […] The results generally support the literature regarding police response to domestic violence while showing some changes are beginning to occur. Although both police and social workers tended to hold the man responsible, police were more inclined to assign some blame to the woman or to the socioeconomic situation, or to suggest both partners held some responsibility for the incident […] The gender distribution of this sample reflects the current reality of overwhelmingly male police forces and primarily female social work agencies. Nevertheless, some of the findings on worker type may be due to gender effect.» (p. 77-78)