Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Children’s Emotional Problems: Can Early Child Care Help Children of Depressed Mothers?

Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Children’s Emotional Problems: Can Early Child Care Help Children of Depressed Mothers?

Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Children’s Emotional Problems: Can Early Child Care Help Children of Depressed Mothers?

Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Children’s Emotional Problems: Can Early Child Care Help Children of Depressed Mothers?s

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Référence bibliographique [11406]

Herba, Catherine M., Tremblay, Richard E., Boivin, Michel, Liu, Xuecheng, Mongeau, Chantal, Séguin, Jean R et Côté, Sylvana M. 2013. «Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Children’s Emotional Problems: Can Early Child Care Help Children of Depressed Mothers? ». JAMA Psychiatry, vol. 70, no 8, p. 830-838.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[W]e investigated whether child care is associated with better mental health outcomes for children of mothers with elevated MDSs [maternal depressive symptoms] during the full preschool period spanning the ages 5 months to 5 years. We extend previous findings by examining the following 3 separate internalizing syndrome profiles to look at the specificity of the effects: emotional problems (EPs), separation anxiety symptoms (SASs), and social withdrawal symptoms (SWSs).» (p. 831)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«We hypothesized that children of mothers with elevated MDSs would demonstrate higher rates of internalizing symptoms (particularly EPs) compared with children of nondepressed mothers. We anticipated that the association between MDSs and children’s EPs would be modified by child care experiences, such that children of mothers with elevated MDSs who received child care during the preschool years would experience lower levels of EPs compared with those in maternal care. In line with previous findings, we predicted that the protective role of child care would be most pronounced for regulated group-based child care. Finally, we hypothesized that an earlier age at entry (before age 17 months) into child care would be most beneficial for children of mothers with elevated MDSs.» (p. 831)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants were enrolled in the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, a representative sample of 2120 infants born in Québec, Canada, in 1997 and 1998 and followed up yearly at ages 5, 17, 30, 42, 54, and 60 months.» (p. 831)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In conclusion, we found for the first time to date in a population-based longitudinal study spanning the full preschool period that early child care has a protective influence for children of mothers with elevated MDSs, reducing children’s risks for EPs and SWSs. Benefits were observed within the context of regulated group-based child care for EPs and applied to early and late entry into child care for EPs and SWSs. Regulated child care services may represent an intervention that buffers the negative effect of MDSs on children’s EPs and SWSs. Our results are consistent with previous studies showing beneficial effects of child care for children living in adverse family environments (eg, low parental education or poverty). Access to regulated and structured child care services should be facilitated not only for children exposed to poverty but also for children of depressed mothers.» (p. 837)