Mothers’ Reports of Their Involvement in Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention

Mothers’ Reports of Their Involvement in Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention

Mothers’ Reports of Their Involvement in Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention

Mothers’ Reports of Their Involvement in Early Intensive Behavioral Interventions

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Référence bibliographique [11394]

Granger, Stephanie, Des Rivières-Pigeon, Catherine, Sabourin, Gabrielle et Forget, Jacques. 2012. «Mothers’ Reports of Their Involvement in Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention ». Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, vol. 32, no 2, p. 68-77.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objective of this study was to identify the forms of involvement adopted by mothers in the context of early intensive behavioral intervention [EIBI].» (p. 69)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Given the scant information available regarding parental involvement in EIBI, this research is intended to be essentially exploratory, seeking to answer the following questions:
1. In what way(s) do mothers participate in the EIBI program?
2. How do they live out this new role, depending on the form of involvement adopted?» (p. 69)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The recruitment [of 13 mothers] took place in a Rehabilitation Center for Intellectual Deficiency and Invasive Developmental Disorders in the Greater Montreal area.» (p. 69)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


À la lumière de ses recherches, l’auteure constate que «[a]ll the mothers in the sample reported that they applied EIBI’s guiding principles—such as reinforcement, consistency in guidelines, and formulation of requests—in everyday life. These principles generally seem to have been well assimilated by the mothers and applied on a regular basis. [They] seemed very conscious of the fact that using the same material as educators and pursuing the same goals is necessary for their child’s integration of all learning processes […].» (p. 72) «[One] form of involvement that was very widespread consisted of attending supervisory meetings. […] However, whether a mother was employed full-time or not seems to be a determining factor regarding her ability to participate in these meetings. The fact of being a stay-at-home mother who did not have to miss work on a regular basis was definitely an advantage […].» Elle note également que «these mothers generally found the experience emotionally difficult, for a variety of reasons. The fatigue entailed in carrying out this kind of intervention was frequently cited […]. Another element making the application of EIBI complicated for mothers was the parent–child relationship, which underwent a change.» (p. 73)