The Father-Child Activation Relationship and Internalising Disorders at Preschool Age

The Father-Child Activation Relationship and Internalising Disorders at Preschool Age

The Father-Child Activation Relationship and Internalising Disorders at Preschool Age

The Father-Child Activation Relationship and Internalising Disorders at Preschool Ages

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [11377]

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The main objective of this study was to verify the hypothesis of an association between the father–child activation relationship and IDs [internalising disorders].» (p. 452)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«First, given that according to the theory fathers would be expected to activate boys more than girls (Paquette & Bigras, 2010), we expected to find a significant difference in the activation score based on the child’s sex. Second, we expected that underactivated children would have significantly higher ID scores, on average, than activated and overactivated children. Third, we expected to find a significant negative relation between the activation score and the total ID score, even after controlling for child temperament and parental behaviour.» (p. 451-452)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Fifty-one father–child dyads (23 boys and 28 girls) were recruited from the general population through advertisements placed in local newspapers in different Montreal neighbourhoods.» (p. 452)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This initial study using the Preschool Risky Situation with a convenience sample of children demonstrates the anticipated difference between boys and girls on the activation score: boys have significantly higher activation scores than girls. This study also demonstrates the anticipated link between underactivation and IDs: underactivated children have significantly higher ID scores than activated children. Finally, our analyses also confirm the hypothesis of a negative link between the child activation score and IDs given that the association is significant after controlling for both child temperament and sex, parental behaviour, and the number of hours worked per week by the fathers. The more positively activated children are in their relationship with their fathers, the fewer IDs they display.» (p. 456-457)