Parental Psychological Violence and Adolescent Behavioral Adjustment: The Role of Coping and Social Support

Parental Psychological Violence and Adolescent Behavioral Adjustment: The Role of Coping and Social Support

Parental Psychological Violence and Adolescent Behavioral Adjustment: The Role of Coping and Social Support

Parental Psychological Violence and Adolescent Behavioral Adjustment: The Role of Coping and Social Supports

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Référence bibliographique [11371]

Gagné, Marie-Hélène et Melançon, Claudiane. 2013. «Parental Psychological Violence and Adolescent Behavioral Adjustment: The Role of Coping and Social Support ». Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 28, no 1, p. 176-200.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study investigates coping strategies as partial mediators between parental psychological violence and internalized and externalized adolescent behavior problems of boys and girls separately. » (p. 180)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Parental violence is expected to elicit both approach and avoidant coping strategies. Approach strategies are expected to be negatively associated with behavior problems, whereas avoidance strategies should show a positive association. In addition, this research aims at studying the moderating effect of social support on the link between psychological violence and behavior problems, while controlling for gender. Social support is expected to play a protective role in buffering the potential detrimental effects of psychological violence on behavioral adjustment.» (p. 180)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«A sample of 278 adolescents were recruited on a voluntary basis in 2006 and 2007 in 3 francophone public schools located in urban and suburban districts of Quebec City.» (p. 180)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«On the whole, the present findings suggest that no particular coping style enhances behavioral adjustment in adolescents struggling with parental psychological violence. Under the stress generated by a violent relationship with parents, these youth may lack the ability to choose the best coping strategy for a particular situation; they might also be inflexible in their application of a certain coping style, which could decrease the efficacy of their coping strategy […] Anchored in a stress-buffering conceptual framework, the present study also aimed at documenting the moderating effect of social support on the link between parental psychological violence and adolescent behavioral adjustment. Social support was expected to play a protective role, by buffering the detrimental effect of psychological violence. This hypothesis was not supported in the present study. First, availability of social support had no moderating effect in this context. Second, even if satisfaction toward social support had a significant moderating effect on the relationship between psychological violence and boys’ externalized problems, this effect was the opposite of what was expected. Greater satisfaction brought an increase in the relationship between psychological violence and externalized problems.» (p. 191)